In the course of
Course Course (k[=o]rs), n. [F. cours, course, L. cursus, fr. currere to run. See {Current}.] 1. The act of moving from one point to another; progress; passage. [1913 Webster]

And when we had finished our course from Tyre, we came to Ptolemais. --Acts xxi. 7. [1913 Webster]

2. The ground or path traversed; track; way. [1913 Webster]

The same horse also run the round course at Newmarket. --Pennant. [1913 Webster]

3. Motion, considered as to its general or resultant direction or to its goal; line progress or advance. [1913 Webster]

A light by which the Argive squadron steers Their silent course to Ilium's well known shore. --Dennham. [1913 Webster]

Westward the course of empire takes its way. --Berkeley. [1913 Webster]

4. Progress from point to point without change of direction; any part of a progress from one place to another, which is in a straight line, or on one direction; as, a ship in a long voyage makes many courses; a course measured by a surveyor between two stations; also, a progress without interruption or rest; a heat; as, one course of a race. [1913 Webster]

5. Motion considered with reference to manner; or derly progress; procedure in a certain line of thought or action; as, the course of an argument. [1913 Webster]

The course of true love never did run smooth. --Shak. [1913 Webster]

6. Customary or established sequence of events; recurrence of events according to natural laws. [1913 Webster]

By course of nature and of law. --Davies. [1913 Webster]

Day and night, Seedtime and harvest, heat and hoary frost, Shall hold their course. --Milton. [1913 Webster]

7. Method of procedure; manner or way of conducting; conduct; behavior. [1913 Webster]

My lord of York commends the plot and the general course of the action. --Shak. [1913 Webster]

By perseverance in the course prescribed. --Wodsworth. [1913 Webster]

You hold your course without remorse. --Tennyson. [1913 Webster]

8. A series of motions or acts arranged in order; a succession of acts or practices connectedly followed; as, a course of medicine; a course of lectures on chemistry. [1913 Webster]

9. The succession of one to another in office or duty; order; turn. [1913 Webster]

He appointed . . . the courses of the priests --2 Chron. viii. 14. [1913 Webster]

10. That part of a meal served at one time, with its accompaniments. [1913 Webster]

He [Goldsmith] wore fine clothes, gave dinners of several courses, paid court to venal beauties. --Macaulay. [1913 Webster]

11. (Arch.) A continuous level range of brick or stones of the same height throughout the face or faces of a building. --Gwilt. [1913 Webster]

12. (Naut.) The lowest sail on any mast of a square-rigged vessel; as, the fore course, main course, etc. [1913 Webster]

13. pl. (Physiol.) The menses. [1913 Webster]

{In course}, in regular succession.

{Of course}, by consequence; as a matter of course; in regular or natural order.

{In the course of}, at same time or times during. ``In the course of human events.'' --T. Jefferson.

Syn: Way; road; route; passage; race; series; succession; manner; method; mode; career; progress. [1913 Webster]


The Collaborative International Dictionary of English. 2000.

Look at other dictionaries:

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