In good faith


In good faith
Faith Faith (f[=a]th), n. [OE. feith, fayth, fay, OF. feid, feit, fei, F. foi, fr. L. fides; akin to fidere to trust, Gr. pei`qein to persuade. The ending th is perhaps due to the influence of such words as truth, health, wealth. See {Bid}, {Bide}, and cf. {Confide}, {Defy}, {Fealty}.] 1. Belief; the assent of the mind to the truth of what is declared by another, resting solely and implicitly on his authority and veracity; reliance on testimony. [1913 Webster]

2. The assent of the mind to the statement or proposition of another, on the ground of the manifest truth of what he utters; firm and earnest belief, on probable evidence of any kind, especially in regard to important moral truth. [1913 Webster]

Faith, that is, fidelity, -- the fealty of the finite will and understanding to the reason. --Coleridge. [1913 Webster]

3. (Judeo-Christian Theol.) (a) The belief in the historic truthfulness of the Scripture narrative, and the supernatural origin of its teachings, sometimes called historical and speculative faith. (b) (Christian Theol.) The belief in the facts and truth of the Scriptures, with a practical love of them; especially, that confiding and affectionate belief in the person and work of Christ, which affects the character and life, and makes a man a true Christian, -- called a practical, evangelical, or saving faith. [1913 Webster]

Without faith it is impossible to please him [God]. --Heb. xi. 6. [1913 Webster]

The faith of the gospel is that emotion of the mind which is called ``trust'' or ``confidence'' exercised toward the moral character of God, and particularly of the Savior. --Dr. T. Dwight. [1913 Webster]

Faith is an affectionate, practical confidence in the testimony of God. --J. Hawes. [1913 Webster]

4. That which is believed on any subject, whether in science, politics, or religion; especially (Theol.), a system of religious belief of any kind; as, the Jewish or Mohammedan faith; the Christian faith; also, the creed or belief of a Christian society or church. [1913 Webster +PJC]

Which to believe of her, Must be a faith that reason without miracle Could never plant in me. --Shak. [1913 Webster]

Now preacheth the faith which once he destroyed. --Gal. i. 23. [1913 Webster]

5. Fidelity to one's promises, or allegiance to duty, or to a person honored and beloved; loyalty. [1913 Webster]

Children in whom is no faith. --Deut. xxvii. 20. [1913 Webster]

Whose failing, while her faith to me remains, I should conceal. --Milton. [1913 Webster]

6. Word or honor pledged; promise given; fidelity; as, he violated his faith. [1913 Webster]

For you alone I broke me faith with injured Palamon. --Dryden. [1913 Webster]

7. Credibility or truth. [R.] [1913 Webster]

The faith of the foregoing narrative. --Mitford. [1913 Webster]

{Act of faith}. See {Auto-da-f['e]}.

{Breach of faith}, {Confession of faith}, etc. See under {Breach}, {Confession}, etc.

{Faith cure}, a method or practice of treating diseases by prayer and the exercise of faith in God.

{In good faith}, with perfect sincerity. [1913 Webster]


The Collaborative International Dictionary of English. 2000.

Look at other dictionaries:

  • good faith — n [translation of Latin bona fides]: honesty, fairness, and lawfulness of purpose: absence of any intent to defraud, act maliciously, or take unfair advantage filed the suit in good faith negotiating in good faith see also good faith exception …   Law dictionary

  • Good faith — Good faith, or in Latin bona fide , is the mental and moral state of honesty, conviction as to the truth or falsehood of a proposition or body of opinion, or as to the rectitude or depravity of a line of conduct, even if the conviction is… …   Wikipedia

  • Good Faith — • A phrase employed to designate the mental and moral state of honest, even if objectively unfounded, conviction as to the truth or falsehood of a proposition or body of opinion, or as to the rectitude or depravity of a line of conduct Catholic… …   Catholic encyclopedia

  • good faith — is an intangible and abstract quality with no technical meaning or statutory definition, and it encompasses, among other things, an honest belief, the absence of malice and the absence of design to defraud or to seek an unconscionable advantage,… …   Black's law dictionary

  • good faith — is an intangible and abstract quality with no technical meaning or statutory definition, and it encompasses, among other things, an honest belief, the absence of malice and the absence of design to defraud or to seek an unconscionable advantage,… …   Black's law dictionary

  • good faith — ➔ faith * * * good faith UK US noun [U] ► a way of behaving that is honest: »Buyers have no right to keep a stolen car once it has been identified as stolen, even if it was bought in good faith. → Compare BAD FAITH(Cf. ↑ …   Financial and business terms

  • good faith — n [U] when a person, country etc intends to be honest and sincere and does not intend to deceive anyone in good faith ▪ The report claimed that the company had acted in good faith . sign/show/gesture etc of good faith ▪ A ceasefire was declared… …   Dictionary of contemporary English

  • good faith exception — n: an exception to the exclusionary rule: evidence obtained by the use of a warrant later found to be unsupported by probable cause is admissible if the investigating officers acted in reasonable reliance that the warrant was valid see also mapp… …   Law dictionary

  • good faith purchaser — n: a purchaser who gives value for an asset in good faith and without knowledge of adverse claims – called also good faith purchaser for value; Merriam Webster’s Dictionary of Law. Merriam Webster. 1996 …   Law dictionary

  • good-faith purchaser — USA bona fide purchaser, Also known as BFP, bona fide purchaser for value, good faith purchaser, innocent purchaser for value, purchaser in good faith …   Law dictionary

  • good faith — noun uncount the intention of behaving in an honest and sincere way: in good faith: I borrowed the money in good faith, but now I can t pay it back …   Usage of the words and phrases in modern English


Share the article and excerpts

Direct link
Do a right-click on the link above
and select “Copy Link”

We are using cookies for the best presentation of our site. Continuing to use this site, you agree with this.