In conclusion
Conclusion Con*clu"sion, n. [F., fr. L. conclusio. See {Conclude}.] 1. The last part of anything; close; termination; end. [1913 Webster]

A fluorish of trumpets announced the conclusion of the contest. --Prescott. [1913 Webster]

2. Final decision; determination; result. [1913 Webster]

And the conclusion is, she shall be thine. --Shak. [1913 Webster]

3. Any inference or result of reasoning. [1913 Webster]

4. (Logic) The inferred proposition of a syllogism; the necessary consequence of the conditions asserted in two related propositions called premises. See {Syllogism}. [1913 Webster]

He granted him both the major and minor, but denied him the conclusion. --Addison. [1913 Webster]

5. Drawing of inferences. [Poetic] [1913 Webster]

Your wife Octavia, with her modest eyes And still conclusion. --Shak. [1913 Webster]

6. An experiment, or something from which a conclusion may be drawn. [Obs.] [1913 Webster]

We practice likewise all conclusions of grafting and inoculating. --Bacon. [1913 Webster]

7. (Law) (a) The end or close of a pleading, e.g., the formal ending of an indictment, ``against the peace,'' etc. (b) An estoppel or bar by which a person is held to a particular position. --Wharton. [1913 Webster]

{Conclusion to the country} (Law), the conclusion of a pleading by which a party ``puts himself upon the country,'' i.e., appeals to the verdict of a jury. --Mozley & W.

{In conclusion}. (a) Finally. (b) In short.

{To try conclusions}, to make a trial or an experiment. [1913 Webster]

Like the famous ape, To try conclusions, in the basket creep. --Shak.

Syn: Inference; deduction; result; consequence; end; decision. See {Inference}. [1913 Webster]


The Collaborative International Dictionary of English. 2000.

Look at other dictionaries:

  • in conclusion — ► FORMAL said or written when you are ending a speech, report, etc.: »I want to re emphasise in conclusion my commitment to the new climate of partnership in this country. »In conclusion, it seems that the increasing incidence of audit committees …   Financial and business terms

  • in conclusion — in conclusion, I d like to remind you that Mr. Clark will be signing books in the cafeteria Syn: finally, in closing, to conclude, last but not least; to sum up, in short, to make a long story short …   Thesaurus of popular words

  • in conclusion — index consequently Burton s Legal Thesaurus. William C. Burton. 2006 …   Law dictionary

  • in conclusion — adverb the item at the end (Freq. 1) last, I ll discuss family values • Syn: ↑last, ↑lastly, ↑finally • Derived from adjective: ↑last (for: ↑ …   Useful english dictionary

  • in conclusion — used in writing or formal speech for showing that the next thing you say will be the last thing you say In conclusion, I would like to thank everyone who helped to make this event possible …   English dictionary

  • in conclusion — finally. He said in conclusion that cooperation between investigators had helped catch the suspects. Usage notes: used by a speaker or writer to begin a final statement …   New idioms dictionary

  • in conclusion — in summary, in short, in brief …   English contemporary dictionary

  • in conclusion — idi lastly; to conclude …   From formal English to slang

  • Conclusion — Con*clu sion, n. [F., fr. L. conclusio. See {Conclude}.] 1. The last part of anything; close; termination; end. [1913 Webster] A fluorish of trumpets announced the conclusion of the contest. Prescott. [1913 Webster] 2. Final decision;… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Conclusion to the country — Conclusion Con*clu sion, n. [F., fr. L. conclusio. See {Conclude}.] 1. The last part of anything; close; termination; end. [1913 Webster] A fluorish of trumpets announced the conclusion of the contest. Prescott. [1913 Webster] 2. Final decision;… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

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