In chief

In chief
Chief Chief (ch[=e]n), n. [OE. chief, chef, OF. chief, F. chef, fr. L. caput head, possibly akin to E. head. Cf. {Captain}, {Chapter}] 1. The head or leader of any body of men; a commander, as of an army; a head man, as of a tribe, clan, or family; a person in authority who directs the work of others; the principal actor or agent. [1913 Webster]

2. The principal part; the most valuable portion. [1913 Webster]

The chief of the things which should be utterly destroyed. --1 Sam. xv. 21 [1913 Webster]

3. (Her.) The upper third part of the field. It is supposed to be composed of the dexter, sinister, and middle chiefs. [1913 Webster]

{In chief}. (a) At the head; as, a commander in chief. (b) (Eng. Law) From the king, or sovereign; as, tenure in chief, tenure directly from the king.

Syn: Chieftain; captain; general; commander; leader; head; principal; sachem; sagamore; sheik.

Usage: {Chief}, {chieftain}, {Commander}, {Leader}. These words fluctuate somewhat in their meaning according to circumstances, but agree in the general idea of rule and authority. The term chief is now more usually applied to one who is a head man, leader, or commander in civil or military affairs, or holds a hereditary or acquired rank in a tribe or clan; as, the chief of police; the chief of an Indian tribe. A chieftain is the chief of a clan or tribe, or a military leader. A commander directs the movements of or has control over a body of men, as a military or naval force. A leader is one whom men follow, as in a political party, a legislative body, a military or scientific expedition, etc., one who takes the command and gives direction in particular enterprises. [1913 Webster]

The Collaborative International Dictionary of English. 2000.

Look at other dictionaries:

  • in-chief — postnominal adj. a suffix signifying the head of a staff; as, editor in chief. [combining form] [WordNet 1.5] …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • in chief — phrasal in the chief position or place often used in titles < commander in chief > …   New Collegiate Dictionary

  • in chief — noun A case in chief is the stage during trial in which the party with the burden of proof presents supporting evidence …   Wiktionary

  • Colonel-in-Chief — In the various Commonwealth armies, the Colonel in Chief of a regiment is its (usually royal) patron. This position is distinct from that of Colonel of the Regiment. They do not have an operational role. They are however kept informed of all… …   Wikipedia

  • Tenant-in-chief — In medieval and early modern European society a tenant in chief, sometimes vassal in chief, denotes the high nobles who held their lands as tenants directly from the monarch, as opposed to holding them from another nobleman or senior member of… …   Wikipedia

  • Vince Taylor (Commander in Chief character) — In the television show Commander in Chief , a political drama aired by ABC, Vince Taylor, played by Anthony Azizi, is the first male President of the United States aide. Known LifeIt is revealed in episode 8 that he is gay and has been found to… …   Wikipedia

  • Richard McDonald (Commander in Chief) — In the television show Commander in Chief , a political drama aired by ABC, Richard McDonald, played by Mark Paul Gosselaar, is a campaign advisor to the President of the United States. He was famous for electing his first governor after the… …   Wikipedia

  • Commander-in-chief — CINC redirects here. For other uses, see CINC (disambiguation). For other uses, see Commander in Chief (disambiguation). Epaulettes of commander in chief of November Uprising Jan Skrzynecki A commande …   Wikipedia

  • Commander-in-Chief of the Canadian Forces — Queen Elizabeth II …   Wikipedia

  • Commander-in-Chief, India — The third British Commander in Chief of India, Major General Robert Clive. Clive was one of the many Commanders in Chief who, as soldier politicals, helped the British gain ascendency in India. The British Commander in Chief in India (or… …   Wikipedia

Share the article and excerpts

Direct link
Do a right-click on the link above
and select “Copy Link”