Immure Im*mure", v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Immured}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Immuring}.] [Pref. im- in + mure: cf. F. emmurer.] 1. To wall around; to surround with walls. [Obs.] --Sandys. [1913 Webster]

2. To inclose whithin walls, or as within walls; hence, to shut up; to imprison; to incarcerate. [1913 Webster]

Those tender babes Whom envy hath immured within your walls. --Shak. [1913 Webster]

This huge convex of fire, Outrageous to devour, immures us round. --Milton. [1913 Webster]

The Collaborative International Dictionary of English. 2000.


Look at other dictionaries:

  • Immure — Im*mure , n. A wall; an inclosure. [Obs.] Shak. [1913 Webster] …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • immure — I verb cast into prison, commit to an institution, commit to prison, confine, constrain, detain, encage, enclose, enclose within walls, entomb, gate, hold, hold captive, hold in captivity, hold in check, hold within bounds, impound, imprison,… …   Law dictionary

  • immure — (v.) 1580s, from M.Fr. emmurer and directly from M.L. immurare, lit. to shut up within walls, from assimilated form of in into, in (see IN (Cf. in ) (2)) + L. murus wall (see MURAL (Cf. mural)). Related: Immured; immuring …   Etymology dictionary

  • immure — imprison, incarcerate, jail, intern Analogous words: confine, circumscribe, *limit, restrict Contrasted words: liberate, *free, release …   New Dictionary of Synonyms

  • immure — ► VERB (usu. be immured) ▪ confine or imprison. DERIVATIVES immurement noun. ORIGIN Latin immurare, from murus wall …   English terms dictionary

  • immure — [i myoor′] vt. immured, immuring [< OFr or ML: OFr emmurrer < ML immurare < L in , in + murus, wall: see MERE3] 1. to shut up within or as within walls; imprison, confine, or seclude 2. to entomb in a wall immurement n …   English World dictionary

  • immure — UK [ɪˈmjʊə(r)] / US [ɪˈmjʊr] verb [transitive] Word forms immure : present tense I/you/we/they immure he/she/it immures present participle immuring past tense immured past participle immured literary to put someone in a place and prevent them… …   English dictionary

  • immure — transitive verb (immured; immuring) Etymology: Medieval Latin immurare, from Latin in + murus wall more at munition Date: 1583 1. a. to enclose within or as if within walls b. imprison 2. to build into a wall; especially to entomb in a wall • …   New Collegiate Dictionary

  • immure — immurement, immuration /im yeuh ray sheuhn/, n. /i myoor /, v.t., immured, immuring. 1. to enclose within walls. 2. to shut in; seclude or confine. 3. to imprison. 4. to build into or entomb in a wall. 5. Obs. to surround with walls; fortify.… …   Universalium

  • immure — verb to put or bury within a wall Johns body was immured Thursday in the mausoleum. See Also: immurement, inter …   Wiktionary

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