Imitate Im"i*tate, v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Imitated}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Imitating}.] [L. imitatus, p. p. of imitari to imitate; of unknown origin. Cf. {Image}.] 1. To follow as a pattern, model, or example; to copy or strive to copy, in acts, manners etc. [1913 Webster]

Despise wealth and imitate a dog. --Cowlay. [1913 Webster]

2. To produce a semblance or likeness of, in form, character, color, qualities, conduct, manners, and the like; to counterfeit; to copy. [1913 Webster]

A place picked out by choice of best alive The Nature's work by art can imitate. --Spenser. [1913 Webster]

This hand appeared a shining sword to weild, And that sustained an imitated shield. --Dryden. [1913 Webster]

3. (Biol.) To resemble (another species of animal, or a plant, or inanimate object) in form, color, ornamentation, or instinctive habits, so as to derive an advantage thereby; sa, when a harmless snake imitates a venomous one in color and manner, or when an odorless insect imitates, in color, one having secretion offensive to birds. [1913 Webster]

The Collaborative International Dictionary of English. 2000.


Look at other dictionaries:

  • imitate — [im′i tāt΄] vt. imitated, imitating [< L imitatus, pp. of imitari, to imitate, akin to aemulus: see EMULATE] 1. to seek to follow the example of; take as one s model or pattern 2. to act the same as; impersonate; mimic 3. to reproduce in form …   English World dictionary

  • imitate — ► VERB 1) follow as a model. 2) copy (a person s speech or mannerisms), especially for comic effect. 3) reproduce; simulate: synthetic fabrics that imitate silk. DERIVATIVES imitable adjective imitator noun. ORIGIN Latin imitari, related to …   English terms dictionary

  • imitate — I verb adopt, caricature, copy, counterfeit, duplicate, echo, emulate, fabricate, fake, follow suit, forge, impersonate, match, mimic, mirror, parallel, parody, parrot, plagiarize, portray, pose, pretend, reflect, repeat, represent, reproduce,… …   Law dictionary

  • imitate — (v.) 1530s, a back formation from IMITATION (Cf. imitation) or imitator, or else from L. imitatus. Related: Imitated; imitating. An Old English word for this was æfterhyrigan …   Etymology dictionary

  • imitate — *copy, mimic, ape, mock Analogous words: impersonate (see ACT vb): simulate, feign, counterfeit (see ASSUME): caricature, burlesque, parody, travesty (see under CARICATURE n) …   New Dictionary of Synonyms

  • imitate — has a derivative form imitable meaning ‘able to be imitated’ …   Modern English usage

  • imitate — [v] pretend to be; do an impression of act like, affect, ape, assume, be like, borrow, burlesque, carbon*, caricature, clone, copy, counterfeit, ditto*, do like*, do likewise, duplicate, echo, emulate, falsify, feign, follow, follow in footsteps* …   New thesaurus

  • imitate — 01. My friend can [imitate] the teacher s voice so well that if you don t see him when he s doing it, you think it is her. 02. There is an expression that says that [imitation] is the sincerest form of flattery. 03. Francois de La Rouchefoucauld… …   Grammatical examples in English

  • imitate — imitator, n. /im i tayt /, v.t., imitated, imitating. 1. to follow or endeavor to follow as a model or example: to imitate an author s style; to imitate an older brother. 2. to mimic; impersonate: The students imitated the teacher behind her back …   Universalium

  • imitate — im|i|tate [ˈımıteıt] v [T] [Date: 1500 1600; : Latin; Origin: , past participle of imitari] 1.) to copy the way someone behaves, speaks, moves etc, especially in order to make people laugh ▪ She was a splendid mimic and loved to imitate Winston… …   Dictionary of contemporary English

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