Illiteracies
Illiteracy Il*lit"er*a*cy, n.; pl. {Illiteracies}. [From {Illiterate}.] 1. The state of being illiterate, or uneducated; lack of learning, or knowledge; ignorance; specifically, inability to read and write; as, the illiteracy shown by the last census. [1913 Webster]

2. An instance of ignorance; a literary blunder. [1913 Webster]

The many blunders and illiteracies of the first publishers of his [Shakespeare's] works. --Pope. [1913 Webster]


The Collaborative International Dictionary of English. 2000.

Look at other dictionaries:

  • illiteracies — This was a term used by Fowler (1926) to denote examples of ‘a kind of offence against the literary idiom that is not easily named’ and identified its chief habitat as the correspondence columns of the newspapers. The instances he gave included… …   Modern English usage

  • illiteracies — il·lit·er·a·cy || ɪ lɪtÉ™rÉ™sɪ / trÉ™sɪ n. inability to read and write; ignorance, lack of education …   English contemporary dictionary

  • Illiteracy — Il*lit er*a*cy, n.; pl. {Illiteracies}. [From {Illiterate}.] 1. The state of being illiterate, or uneducated; lack of learning, or knowledge; ignorance; specifically, inability to read and write; as, the illiteracy shown by the last census. [1913 …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • illiteracy — /i lit euhr euh see/, n., pl. illiteracies for 3. 1. a lack of ability to read and write. 2. the state of being illiterate; lack of any or enough education. 3. a mistake in writing or speaking, felt to be characteristic of an illiterate or… …   Universalium

  • God Is Not Great — Infobox Book author = Hitchens, Christopher name = God is not Great country = United States language = English subject = Religion publisher = Twelve Books release date = May 1, 2007 media type = Hardcover, Audio book isbn = ISBN 978 0 446 57980 3 …   Wikipedia

  • bust, burst — The principal parts of burst are burst, burst, burst. As verb forms, bust and busted are illiteracies. To get busted ( to be arrested ), to go bust ( to become bankrupt ), to bust up ( to disagree, to break up ), and a bust ( failure ) are slang… …   Dictionary of problem words and expressions

  • could of — In normal speech, could have sounds like could ve, which in turn sounds like could of. Not only could of but also may of, might of, should of, and would of are illiteracies. Of is not a verb. I could hav …   Dictionary of problem words and expressions

  • disregardless, irregardless — Both words are illiteracies. The prefixes ir and dis are superfluous. Say regardless, unmindful, heedless, anyway, or even the wordy in spite of everything and thus avoid a double negative (dis and ir plus less): Regardless (not disregardless or… …   Dictionary of problem words and expressions

  • don't, don't think — Don t is a contraction of do not. Avoid such illiteracies as he don t, they don t got, and if don t seem. Do is a verb in the present tense and is never used in the third person singular; use does. Don t think, a familiar, widely used expression …   Dictionary of problem words and expressions

  • it, its, it's, it's me — It is a short, necessary word often used in a vague or indefinite way to stand for, or refer to, a variety of things and ideas. The term also appears in expressions that are trite or slangy, such as to get with it, be with it, have if ( be… …   Dictionary of problem words and expressions

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