Hurtled
Hurtle Hur"tle, v. i. [imp. & p. p. {Hurtled}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Hurtling}.] [OE. hurtlen, freq. of hurten. See {Hurt}, v. t., and cf. {Hurl}.] 1. To meet with violence or shock; to clash; to jostle. [1913 Webster]

Together hurtled both their steeds. --Fairfax. [1913 Webster]

2. To move rapidly; to wheel or rush suddenly or with violence; to whirl round rapidly; to skirmish. [1913 Webster]

Now hurtling round, advantage for to take. --Spenser. [1913 Webster]

Down the hurtling cataract of the ages. --R. L. Stevenson. [1913 Webster]

3. To make a threatening sound, like the clash of arms; to make a sound as of confused clashing or confusion; to resound. [1913 Webster]

The noise of battle hurtled in the air. --Shak. [1913 Webster]

The earthquake sound Hurtling 'death the solid ground. --Mrs. Browning. [1913 Webster]


The Collaborative International Dictionary of English. 2000.

Look at other dictionaries:

  • hurtled — hur·tle || hÉœrtl / hɜːtl v. move forcefully, fly …   English contemporary dictionary

  • hur|tle — «HUR tuhl», verb, tled, tling, noun. –v.i. 1. to dash or drive violently; rush suddenly; come with a crash: »The car hurtled across the road into a fence. SYNONYM(S): dart, shoot. 2. to move with clattering or clashing; rush noisily or violently …   Useful english dictionary

  • Hurtle — Hur tle, v. i. [imp. & p. p. {Hurtled}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Hurtling}.] [OE. hurtlen, freq. of hurten. See {Hurt}, v. t., and cf. {Hurl}.] 1. To meet with violence or shock; to clash; to jostle. [1913 Webster] Together hurtled both their steeds.… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Hurtling — Hurtle Hur tle, v. i. [imp. & p. p. {Hurtled}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Hurtling}.] [OE. hurtlen, freq. of hurten. See {Hurt}, v. t., and cf. {Hurl}.] 1. To meet with violence or shock; to clash; to jostle. [1913 Webster] Together hurtled both their… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • hurtle — /herr tl/, v., hurtled, hurtling, n. v.i. 1. to rush violently; move with great speed: The car hurtled down the highway. 2. to move or go noisily or resoundingly, as with violent or rapid motion: The sound was deafening, as tons of snow hurtled… …   Universalium

  • hurtle — UK [ˈhɜː(r)t(ə)l] / US [ˈhɜrt(ə)l] verb [intransitive] Word forms hurtle : present tense I/you/we/they hurtle he/she/it hurtles present participle hurtling past tense hurtled past participle hurtled to move very quickly, especially in an… …   English dictionary

  • Fiat Mefistofele — Infobox Automobile name = Fiat Mefistofele manufacturer = Fiat parent company = aka = SB 4 production = 1908 assembly = predecessor = successor = class = Race car body style = layout = platform = engine = Fiat A.12 transmission = Manual wheelbase …   Wikipedia

  • hurtle — 1. verb /hɜːtl,hɝtl/ a) To move rapidly, violently, or without control. The car hurtled down the hill at 90 miles per hour. b) To meet with violence or shock; to clash; to jostle. Pieces of broken glass hurt …   Wiktionary

  • John Bosco — (1815–1888)    Saint and founder of the Society of St. Francis De Sales, known as the Salesians. John Bosco was known as the “Dreaming Saint” because of his frequent lucid dreams, more like out of body travels, in which he encountered angels,… …   Encyclopedia of Demons and Demonology

  • hurtle — verb (hurtled; hurtling) Etymology: Middle English hurtlen to collide, frequentative of hurten to cause to strike, hurt Date: 14th century intransitive verb to move rapidly or forcefully transitive verb hurl, fling • hurtle noun …   New Collegiate Dictionary

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