aphaeresis
aphaeresis a*phaer"e*sis, ||Aphaeresis A*ph[ae]r"e*sis(?; 277), n. [L.] Same as {Apheresis}. [1913 Webster]

The Collaborative International Dictionary of English. 2000.

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  • Aphaeresis — a*phaer e*sis, ||Aphaeresis A*ph[ae]r e*sis(?; 277), n. [L.] Same as {Apheresis}. [1913 Webster] …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • aphaeresis — noun (plural aphaereses) Etymology: Late Latin, from Greek aphairesis, literally, taking off, from aphairein to take away, from apo + hairein to take Date: circa 1550 the loss of one or more sounds or letters at the beginning of a word (as in… …   New Collegiate Dictionary

  • Aphaeresis — См. afèresi …   Пятиязычный словарь лингвистических терминов

  • aphaeresis — aphaeretic /af euh ret ik/, adj. /euh fer euh sis/, n. apheresis. * * * …   Universalium

  • aphaeresis — n. (Linguistics) cutting off the beginning of words …   English contemporary dictionary

  • aphaeresis — aphaer·e·sis …   English syllables

  • aphaeresis — /əˈfɛrəsəs/ (say uh feruhsuhs) noun the omission of a letter, phoneme, or unstressed syllable at the beginning of a word, as in squire for esquire. Also, Chiefly US, apheresis. {Latin, from Greek aphairesis removal} –aphaeretic /æfəˈrɛtɪk/ (say… …   Australian English dictionary

  • aphaeresis —   n. cutting off beginning of word.    ♦ aphaeretic, a …   Dictionary of difficult words

  • aphaeresis — n. (pl. aphaereses) the omission of a letter or syllable at the beginning of a word as a morphological development (e.g. in the derivation of adder). Etymology: LL f. Gk aphairesis (as APO , haireo take) …   Useful english dictionary

  • Aphesis — In phonetics, aphaeresis (pron en|əˈfɪərɨsɪs, from Greek apo away, hairein to take), also known as aphesis (pron en|ˈæfɨsɪs, from Greek apo away, hienai to send), is the loss of one or more sounds from the beginning of a word; especially, the… …   Wikipedia

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