Hove in stays
Stay Stay (st[=a]), n. [AS. st[ae]g, akin to D., G., Icel., Sw., & Dan. stag; cf. OF. estai, F. ['e]tai, of Teutonic origin.] (Naut.) A large, strong rope, employed to support a mast, by being extended from the head of one mast down to some other, or to some part of the vessel. Those which lead forward are called fore-and-aft stays; those which lead to the vessel's side are called backstays. See Illust. of {Ship}. [1913 Webster]

{In stays}, or {Hove in stays} (Naut.), in the act or situation of staying, or going about from one tack to another. --R. H. Dana, Jr.

{Stay holes} (Naut.), openings in the edge of a staysail through which the hanks pass which join it to the stay.

{Stay tackle} (Naut.), a tackle attached to a stay and used for hoisting or lowering heavy articles over the side.

{To miss stays} (Naut.), to fail in the attempt to go about. --Totten.

{Triatic stay} (Naut.), a rope secured at the ends to the heads of the foremast and mainmast with thimbles spliced to its bight into which the stay tackles hook. [1913 Webster]


The Collaborative International Dictionary of English. 2000.

Look at other dictionaries:

  • In stays — Stay Stay (st[=a]), n. [AS. st[ae]g, akin to D., G., Icel., Sw., & Dan. stag; cf. OF. estai, F. [ e]tai, of Teutonic origin.] (Naut.) A large, strong rope, employed to support a mast, by being extended from the head of one mast down to some other …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • To heave in stays — Heave Heave (h[=e]v), v. t. [imp. {Heaved} (h[=e]vd), or {Hove} (h[=o]v); p. p. {Heaved}, {Hove}, formerly {Hoven} (h[=o] v n); p. pr. & vb. n. {Heaving}.] [OE. heven, hebben, AS. hebban; akin to OS. hebbian, D. heffen, OHG. heffan, hevan, G.… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Stays (nautical) — Stays are the heavy ropes, wires, or rods on sailing vessels that run from the masts to the hull, usually fore and aft along the centerline of the vessel. The stay that runs aft is called backstay and the stay that runs forward is called forestay …   Wikipedia

  • Hove — Heave Heave (h[=e]v), v. t. [imp. {Heaved} (h[=e]vd), or {Hove} (h[=o]v); p. p. {Heaved}, {Hove}, formerly {Hoven} (h[=o] v n); p. pr. & vb. n. {Heaving}.] [OE. heven, hebben, AS. hebban; akin to OS. hebbian, D. heffen, OHG. heffan, hevan, G.… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Hove — Heave Heave (h[=e]v), v. t. [imp. {Heaved} (h[=e]vd), or {Hove} (h[=o]v); p. p. {Heaved}, {Hove}, formerly {Hoven} (h[=o] v n); p. pr. & vb. n. {Heaving}.] [OE. heven, hebben, AS. hebban; akin to OS. hebbian, D. heffen, OHG. heffan, hevan, G.… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • To miss stays — Stay Stay (st[=a]), n. [AS. st[ae]g, akin to D., G., Icel., Sw., & Dan. stag; cf. OF. estai, F. [ e]tai, of Teutonic origin.] (Naut.) A large, strong rope, employed to support a mast, by being extended from the head of one mast down to some other …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • To heave in — Heave Heave (h[=e]v), v. t. [imp. {Heaved} (h[=e]vd), or {Hove} (h[=o]v); p. p. {Heaved}, {Hove}, formerly {Hoven} (h[=o] v n); p. pr. & vb. n. {Heaving}.] [OE. heven, hebben, AS. hebban; akin to OS. hebbian, D. heffen, OHG. heffan, hevan, G.… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • 1750–1795 in fashion — Portrait of John and Elizabeth Lloyd Cadwalader and their Daughter Anne by Charles Willson Peale, Philadelphia, 1772 Fashion in the period 1750–1795 in European and European influenced countries reached heights of fantasy and abundant… …   Wikipedia

  • 1750-1795 in fashion — [ Charles Willson Peale, Philadelphia, 1772] Fashion in the period 1750 1795 in European and European influenced countries reached heights of fantasy and abundant ornamentation, especially among the aristocracy of France, before a long simmering… …   Wikipedia

  • Stay — (st[=a]), n. [AS. st[ae]g, akin to D., G., Icel., Sw., & Dan. stag; cf. OF. estai, F. [ e]tai, of Teutonic origin.] (Naut.) A large, strong rope, employed to support a mast, by being extended from the head of one mast down to some other, or to… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

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