House House, v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Housed}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Housing}.] [AS. h?sian.] 1. To take or put into a house; to shelter under a roof; to cover from the inclemencies of the weather; to protect by covering; as, to house one's family in a comfortable home; to house farming utensils; to house cattle. [1913 Webster]

At length have housed me in a humble shed. --Young. [1913 Webster]

House your choicest carnations, or rather set them under a penthouse. --Evelyn. [1913 Webster]

2. To drive to a shelter. --Shak. [1913 Webster]

3. To admit to residence; to harbor. [1913 Webster]

Palladius wished him to house all the Helots. --Sir P. Sidney. [1913 Webster]

4. To deposit and cover, as in the grave. --Sandys. [1913 Webster]

5. (Naut.) To stow in a safe place; to take down and make safe; as, to house the upper spars. [1913 Webster]

The Collaborative International Dictionary of English. 2000.


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