Higher geometry
Geometry Ge*om"e*try, n.; pl. {Geometries}[F. g['e]om['e]trie, L. geometria, fr. Gr. ?, fr. ? to measure land; ge`a, gh^, the earth + ? to measure. So called because one of its earliest and most important applications was to the measurement of the earth's surface. See {Geometer}.] 1. That branch of mathematics which investigates the relations, properties, and measurement of solids, surfaces, lines, and angles; the science which treats of the properties and relations of magnitudes; the science of the relations of space. [1913 Webster]

2. A treatise on this science. [1913 Webster]

{Analytical geometry}, or {Co["o]rdinate geometry}, that branch of mathematical analysis which has for its object the analytical investigation of the relations and properties of geometrical magnitudes.

{Descriptive geometry}, that part of geometry which treats of the graphic solution of all problems involving three dimensions.

{Elementary geometry}, that part of geometry which treats of the simple properties of straight lines, circles, plane surface, solids bounded by plane surfaces, the sphere, the cylinder, and the right cone.

{Higher geometry}, that pert of geometry which treats of those properties of straight lines, circles, etc., which are less simple in their relations, and of curves and surfaces of the second and higher degrees. [1913 Webster]


The Collaborative International Dictionary of English. 2000.

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  • Geometry — Ge*om e*try, n.; pl. {Geometries}[F. g[ e]om[ e]trie, L. geometria, fr. Gr. ?, fr. ? to measure land; ge a, gh^, the earth + ? to measure. So called because one of its earliest and most important applications was to the measurement of the earth s …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

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  • geometry — [dʒɪ ɒmɪtri] noun (plural geometries) 1》 the branch of mathematics concerned with the properties and relations of points, lines, surfaces, solids, and higher dimensional analogues. 2》 the shape and relative arrangement of the parts of something.… …   English new terms dictionary

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