Hemoptysis He*mop"ty*sis, n. [NL., fr. Gr. a"i^ma blood + ? to spit: cf. F. h['e]moptysie.] (Med.) The expectoration of blood, due usually to hemorrhage from the mucous membrane of the lungs. [1913 Webster]

The Collaborative International Dictionary of English. 2000.

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  • Hemoptysis — ICD 10 R04.2 ICD 9 786.3 DiseasesDB 5578 …   Wikipedia

  • hemoptysis — [hē mäp′tə sis, hem äp′tə sis] n. [ModL < HEMO + Gr ptysis, spitting < ptyein, to spit out < IE echoic base (s)pyū > L spuere, SPEW] the spitting or coughing up of blood: usually caused by bleeding of the lungs or bronchi …   English World dictionary

  • Hemoptysis — Spitting up blood or blood tinged sputum. Pronounced he MOP tis is. The word “hemoptysis” comes from the Greek “haima” for “blood” + “ptysis” meaning “a spitting” = a spitting of blood. The source of the blood was originally not specified but now …   Medical dictionary

  • hemoptysis — noun Etymology: New Latin, from hem + Greek ptysis act of spitting, from ptyein to spit more at spew Date: 1646 expectoration of blood from some part of the respiratory tract …   New Collegiate Dictionary

  • hemoptysis — /hi mop teuh sis/, n. Pathol. the expectoration of blood or bloody mucus. [1640 50; < NL, equiv. to hemo HEMO + Gk ptýsis spitting; cf. ptýein to spit] * * * …   Universalium

  • hemoptysis — noun expectoration (coughing up) of blood …   Wiktionary

  • hemoptysis — n. spitting up of blood or bloody mucus …   English contemporary dictionary

  • hemoptysis — he·mop·ty·sis …   English syllables

  • hemoptysis — he•mop•ty•sis [[t]hɪˈmɒp tə sɪs[/t]] n. pat the expectoration of blood or bloody mucus • Etymology: hemo + Gk ptýsis spitting (ptý(ein)to spit + sis sis) …   From formal English to slang

  • hemoptysis —    Coughing up blood or pulmonary bleeding. If simply resulting from excessive coughing, where bleeding is from prolonged tracheal or pharynx irritation and minute mucosal hemorrhage, it can be self treatable ...anything else and start worrying …   Herbal-medical glossary

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