Heave


Heave
Heave Heave, n. 1. An effort to raise something, as a weight, or one's self, or to move something heavy. [1913 Webster]

After many strains and heaves He got up to his saddle eaves. --Hudibras. [1913 Webster]

2. An upward motion; a rising; a swell or distention, as of the breast in difficult breathing, of the waves, of the earth in an earthquake, and the like. [1913 Webster]

There's matter in these sighs, these profound heaves, You must translate. --Shak. [1913 Webster]

None could guess whether the next heave of the earthquake would settle . . . or swallow them. --Dryden. [1913 Webster]

3. (Geol.) A horizontal dislocation in a metallic lode, taking place at an intersection with another lode. [1913 Webster]


The Collaborative International Dictionary of English. 2000.

Synonyms:

Look at other dictionaries:

  • Heave — (h[=e]v), v. t. [imp. {Heaved} (h[=e]vd), or {Hove} (h[=o]v); p. p. {Heaved}, {Hove}, formerly {Hoven} (h[=o] v n); p. pr. & vb. n. {Heaving}.] [OE. heven, hebben, AS. hebban; akin to OS. hebbian, D. heffen, OHG. heffan, hevan, G. heben, Icel.… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Heave — (h[=e]v), v. i. 1. To be thrown up or raised; to rise upward, as a tower or mound. [1913 Webster] And the huge columns heave into the sky. Pope. [1913 Webster] Where heaves the turf in many a moldering heap. Gray. [1913 Webster] The heaving sods… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • heave to — {v.} To bring a ship to a stop; bring a sailing ship to a standstill by setting the sails in a certain way. * / Heave to! the captain shouted to his crew./ * /We fired a warning shot across the front of the pirate ship to make her heave to./ …   Dictionary of American idioms

  • heave to — {v.} To bring a ship to a stop; bring a sailing ship to a standstill by setting the sails in a certain way. * / Heave to! the captain shouted to his crew./ * /We fired a warning shot across the front of the pirate ship to make her heave to./ …   Dictionary of American idioms

  • heave — heave; heave·less; up·heave; up·heave·ment; …   English syllables

  • heave — ► VERB (past and past part. heaved or chiefly Nautical hove) 1) lift or haul with great effort. 2) produce (a sigh) noisily. 3) informal throw (something heavy). 4) rise and fall rhythmically or spasmodically. 5) …   English terms dictionary

  • heave-ho — ☆ heave ho [hēv′hō′] n. [see the phrase HEAVE HO! in HEAVE ] Informal dismissal, as from a position: chiefly in the phrase give (or get) the (old) heave ho …   English World dictionary

  • heave — [hēv] vt. HEAVED or (esp. Naut.) hove, heaving, heaved [ME heven < OE hebban, akin to Ger heben (Goth hafjan) < IE base * kap , to seize, grasp > HAVE, L capere] 1. to raise or lift, esp. with effort 2. a) to lift in this …   English World dictionary

  • heave-ho — interjection, n 1.) old fashioned used as an encouragement to a person or group of people who are pulling something, especially on ships 2.) give someone the (old) heave ho informal to end a relationship with someone, or to make someone leave… …   Dictionary of contemporary English

  • heave-ho — noun give someone the heave ho INFORMAL 1. ) to end a relationship with someone 2. ) to tell someone they have to leave their job …   Usage of the words and phrases in modern English

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