heads or tails
Cross Cross (kr[o^]s; 115), n. [OE. crois, croys, cros; the former fr. OF. crois, croiz, F. croix, fr. L. crux; the second is perh. directly fr. Prov. cros, crotz. fr. the same L. crux; cf. Icel. kross. Cf. {Crucial}, {Crusade}, {Cruise}, {Crux}.] [1913 Webster] 1. A gibbet, consisting of two pieces of timber placed transversely upon one another, in various forms, as a T, or +, with the horizontal piece below the upper end of the upright, or as an X. It was anciently used in the execution of criminals. [1913 Webster]

Nailed to the cross By his own nation. --Milton. [1913 Webster]

2. The sign or mark of the cross, made with the finger, or in ink, etc., or actually represented in some material; the symbol of Christ's death; the ensign and chosen symbol of Christianity, of a Christian people, and of Christendom. [1913 Webster]

The custom of making the sign of the cross with the hand or finger, as a means of conferring blessing or preserving from evil, is very old. --Schaff-Herzog Encyc. [1913 Webster]

Before the cross has waned the crescent's ray. --Sir W. Scott. [1913 Webster]

Tis where the cross is preached. --Cowper. [1913 Webster]

3. Affiction regarded as a test of patience or virtue; trial; disappointment; opposition; misfortune. [1913 Webster]

Heaven prepares a good man with crosses. --B. Jonson. [1913 Webster]

4. A piece of money stamped with the figure of a cross, also, that side of such a piece on which the cross is stamped; hence, money in general. [1913 Webster]

I should bear no cross if I did bear you; for I think you have no money in your purse. --Shak. [1913 Webster]

5. An appendage or ornament or anything in the form of a cross; a badge or ornamental device of the general shape of a cross; hence, such an ornament, even when varying considerably from that form; thus, the Cross of the British Order of St. George and St. Michael consists of a central medallion with seven arms radiating from it. [1913 Webster]

6. (Arch.) A monument in the form of a cross, or surmounted by a cross, set up in a public place; as, a market cross; a boundary cross; Charing Cross in London. [1913 Webster]

Dun-Edin's Cross, a pillared stone, Rose on a turret octagon. --Sir W. Scott. [1913 Webster]

7. (Her.) A common heraldic bearing, of which there are many varieties. See the Illustration, above. [1913 Webster]

8. The crosslike mark or symbol used instead of a signature by those unable to write. [1913 Webster]

Five Kentish abbesses . . . .subscribed their names and crosses. --Fuller. [1913 Webster]

9. Church lands. [Ireland] [Obs.] --Sir J. Davies. [1913 Webster]

10. A line drawn across or through another line. [1913 Webster]

11. Hence: A mixing of breeds or stock, especially in cattle breeding; or the product of such intermixture; a hybrid of any kind. [1913 Webster]

Toning down the ancient Viking into a sort of a cross between Paul Jones and Jeremy Diddler. --Lord Dufferin. [1913 Webster]

12. (Surveying) An instrument for laying of offsets perpendicular to the main course. [1913 Webster]

13. (Mech.) A pipe-fitting with four branches the axes of which usually form's right angle. [1913 Webster]

{Cross and pile}, a game with money, at which it is put to chance whether a coin shall fall with that side up which bears the cross, or the other, which is called pile, or reverse; the game called {heads or tails}.

{Cross bottony} or

{Cross botton['e]}. See under {Bottony}.

{Cross estoil['e]} (Her.). a cross, each of whose arms is pointed like the ray of a star; that is, a star having four long points only.

{Cross of Calvary}. See {Calvary}, 3.

{Southern cross}. (Astron.) See under {Southern}.

{To do a thing on the cross}, to act dishonestly; -- opposed to acting on the square. [Slang]

{To take up the cross}, to bear troubles and afflictions with patience from love to Christ. [1913 Webster]


The Collaborative International Dictionary of English. 2000.

Look at other dictionaries:

  • Heads or Tails — is a coin tossing game. Most coins have a side where the imprint of a person, such as a current or former head of state, is impressed mdash; this side is called the heads side. The other side is called the tails side, irrespective of its design.… …   Wikipedia

  • heads or tails — {n. phr.} The two sides of a coin, especially when the coin is tossed in the air in order to decide which of two alternatives are to be followed. * /Tom tossed a quarter in the air and said, Tails, I win; heads you win. / …   Dictionary of American idioms

  • heads or tails — {n. phr.} The two sides of a coin, especially when the coin is tossed in the air in order to decide which of two alternatives are to be followed. * /Tom tossed a quarter in the air and said, Tails, I win; heads you win. / …   Dictionary of American idioms

  • heads or tails? — heads or ˈtails? idiom used to ask sb which side of a coin they think will be facing upwards when it is tossed in order to decide sth by chance Main entry: ↑headidiom …   Useful english dictionary

  • Heads or tails — Head Head (h[e^]d), n. [OE. hed, heved, heaved, AS. he[ a]fod; akin to D. hoofd, OHG. houbit, G. haupt, Icel. h[ o]fu[eth], Sw. hufvud, Dan. hoved, Goth. haubi[thorn]. The word does not correspond regularly to L. caput head (cf. E. {Chief},… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • heads or tails — noun plural but singular in construction : a simple gambling game in which a coin is tossed and won by the player who successfully calls the side that lands upward compare head or tail * * * 1. a gambling game in which a coin is tossed, the… …   Useful english dictionary

  • heads or tails — choose one or the other, which side of the coin?    Heads or tails? the gambler asked as he flipped the coin …   English idioms

  • Heads or Tails — Filmdaten Originaltitel: J’en suis! Produktionsland: Kanada (Québec) Erscheinungsjahr: 1997 Länge: ca. 104 Minuten Originalsprache: Französisch …   Deutsch Wikipedia

  • heads\ or\ tails — n. phr. the two sides of a coin, especially when the coin is tossed in the air in order to decide which of two alternatives are to be followed. Tom tossed a quarter in the air and said, tails, I win; heads you win …   Словарь американских идиом

  • heads or tails — 1. a gambling game in which a coin is tossed, the winner being the player who guesses which side of the coin will face up when it lands or is caught. 2. the tossing of a coin in this manner to determine a question or choice. [1675 85] * * * …   Universalium

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