Headforemost
Headfirst Head`first" (h[e^]d"f[~e]rst`), Headforemost Head`fore"most` (h[e^]d`f[=o]r"m[=o]st`), adv. With the head foremost; -- of motion. [1913 Webster]

The Collaborative International Dictionary of English. 2000.

Look at other dictionaries:

  • headforemost — adverb Date: 1697 headfirst …   New Collegiate Dictionary

  • headforemost — /hed fawr mohst , meuhst, fohr /, adv. headfirst (def. 1). [1615 25; HEAD + FOREMOST] * * * …   Universalium

  • headforemost — adverb headfirst Syn: facefirst, faceforemost, headfirst, headlong …   Wiktionary

  • headforemost — adv. with the head first; recklessly, thoughtlessly …   English contemporary dictionary

  • headforemost — (ˈ) ̷ ̷ˈ ̷ ̷(ˌ) ̷ ̷ adverb : headfirst, headlong …   Useful english dictionary

  • headlong — adv 1. headforemost, headfirst, head on, diving, in a dive, plunging, in a nose dive. 2. quickly, speedily, hurriedly; promptly, instantly, straightway, Sl. pronto, in a wink, in a jiffy, in a trice, in an instant, double quick, Inf. like greased …   A Note on the Style of the synonym finder

  • Dive — Dive, n. 1. A plunge headforemost into water, the act of one who dives, literally or figuratively. [1913 Webster] 2. A place of low resort. [Slang] [1913 Webster] The music halls and dives in the lower part of the city. J. Hawthorne. [1913… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Headfirst — Head first (h[e^]d f[ e]rst ), Headforemost Head fore most (h[e^]d f[=o]r m[=o]st ), adv. With the head foremost; of motion. [1913 Webster] …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Headlong — Head long ( l[o^]ng ; 115), adv. [OE. hedling, hevedlynge; prob. confused with E. long, a. & adv.] [1913 Webster] 1. With the head foremost; headforemost; head first; as, to fall headlong. Acts i. 18. [1913 Webster] 2. Rashly; precipitately;… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Angelo Faticoni — (1859 1931), was also known as The Human Cork due to his phenomenal and unnatural buoyancy. He could stay afloat for 15 hours at a time with 20 pounds of lead tied to his ankles.The New York Herald Tribune published his obituary on August 13 1931 …   Wikipedia

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