hatchet-faced
Hatchet Hatch"et (-[e^]t), n. [F. hachette, dim. of hache ax. See 1st {Hatch}, {Hash}.] 1. A small ax with a short handle, to be used with one hand. [1913 Webster]

2. Specifically, a tomahawk. [1913 Webster]

Buried was the bloody hatchet. --Longfellow. [1913 Webster]

{hatchet face}, a thin, sharp face, like the edge of a hatchet; hence:

{hatchet-faced}, sharp-visaged. --Dryden.

{To bury the hatchet}, to make peace or become reconciled.

{To take up the hatchet}, to make or declare war. The last two phrases are derived from the practice of the American Indians.


The Collaborative International Dictionary of English. 2000.

Look at other dictionaries:

  • hatchet-faced — hatchet .faced adj having an unpleasantly thin face with sharp features …   Dictionary of contemporary English

  • hatchet-faced — ► ADJECTIVE informal ▪ sharp featured and grim looking …   English terms dictionary

  • hatchet-faced — adjective see hatchet face * * * ˈhatchet faced [hatchet faced] adjective (disapproving) (of a person) having a long thin face and sharp featur …   Useful english dictionary

  • hatchet-faced — adjective see hatchet face …   New Collegiate Dictionary

  • hatchet-faced — See hatchet face. * * * …   Universalium

  • hatchet-faced — hatch|et faced [ hætʃət,feıst ] adjective having a long, thin, and unpleasant looking face with a pointed nose and chin …   Usage of the words and phrases in modern English

  • hatchet-faced — adjective Having a narrow face with sharp features …   Wiktionary

  • hatchet-faced — adjective informal sharp featured and with a grim expression …   English new terms dictionary

  • hatchet-faced — adjective having an unpleasantly thin face with sharp features …   Longman dictionary of contemporary English

  • hatchet-faced — UK [ˈhætʃɪt ˌfeɪst] / US [ˈhætʃətˌfeɪst] adjective having a long, thin, and unpleasant looking face with a pointed nose and chin …   English dictionary

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