Harpy fly
Harpy Har"py (h[aum]r"p[y^]), n.; pl. {Harpies} (-p[i^]z). [F. harpie, L. harpyia, Gr. "a`rpyia, from the root of "arpa`zein to snatch, to seize. Cf. {Rapacious}.] 1. (Gr. Myth.) A fabulous winged monster, ravenous and filthy, having the face of a woman and the body of a vulture, with long claws, and the face pale with hunger. Some writers mention two, others three. [1913 Webster]

Both table and provisions vanished quite. With sound of harpies' wings and talons heard. --Milton. [1913 Webster]

2. One who is rapacious or ravenous; an extortioner. [1913 Webster]

The harpies about all pocket the pool. --Goldsmith. [1913 Webster]

3. (Zo["o]l.) (a) The European moor buzzard or marsh harrier ({Circus [ae]ruginosus}). (b) A large and powerful, double-crested, short-winged American eagle ({Thrasa["e]tus harpyia}). It ranges from Texas to Brazil. [1913 Webster]

{Harpy bat} (Zo["o]l.) (a) An East Indian fruit bat of the genus {Harpyia} (esp. {Harpyia cephalotes}), having prominent, tubular nostrils. (b) A small, insectivorous Indian bat ({Harpiocephalus harpia}).

{Harpy fly} (Zo["o]l.), the house fly. [1913 Webster]


The Collaborative International Dictionary of English. 2000.

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  • Harpy — Har py (h[aum]r p[y^]), n.; pl. {Harpies} ( p[i^]z). [F. harpie, L. harpyia, Gr. a rpyia, from the root of arpa zein to snatch, to seize. Cf. {Rapacious}.] 1. (Gr. Myth.) A fabulous winged monster, ravenous and filthy, having the face of a woman… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Harpy bat — Harpy Har py (h[aum]r p[y^]), n.; pl. {Harpies} ( p[i^]z). [F. harpie, L. harpyia, Gr. a rpyia, from the root of arpa zein to snatch, to seize. Cf. {Rapacious}.] 1. (Gr. Myth.) A fabulous winged monster, ravenous and filthy, having the face of a… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Harpy — For other uses, see Harpy (disambiguation). Harpy Mythology Greek Grouping Legendary creature Sub grouping Hybrid …   Wikipedia

  • Circus aeruginosus — Harpy Har py (h[aum]r p[y^]), n.; pl. {Harpies} ( p[i^]z). [F. harpie, L. harpyia, Gr. a rpyia, from the root of arpa zein to snatch, to seize. Cf. {Rapacious}.] 1. (Gr. Myth.) A fabulous winged monster, ravenous and filthy, having the face of a… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Harpies — Harpy Har py (h[aum]r p[y^]), n.; pl. {Harpies} ( p[i^]z). [F. harpie, L. harpyia, Gr. a rpyia, from the root of arpa zein to snatch, to seize. Cf. {Rapacious}.] 1. (Gr. Myth.) A fabulous winged monster, ravenous and filthy, having the face of a… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Harpiocephalus harpia — Harpy Har py (h[aum]r p[y^]), n.; pl. {Harpies} ( p[i^]z). [F. harpie, L. harpyia, Gr. a rpyia, from the root of arpa zein to snatch, to seize. Cf. {Rapacious}.] 1. (Gr. Myth.) A fabulous winged monster, ravenous and filthy, having the face of a… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Harpyia cephalotes — Harpy Har py (h[aum]r p[y^]), n.; pl. {Harpies} ( p[i^]z). [F. harpie, L. harpyia, Gr. a rpyia, from the root of arpa zein to snatch, to seize. Cf. {Rapacious}.] 1. (Gr. Myth.) A fabulous winged monster, ravenous and filthy, having the face of a… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Thrasaetus harpyia — Harpy Har py (h[aum]r p[y^]), n.; pl. {Harpies} ( p[i^]z). [F. harpie, L. harpyia, Gr. a rpyia, from the root of arpa zein to snatch, to seize. Cf. {Rapacious}.] 1. (Gr. Myth.) A fabulous winged monster, ravenous and filthy, having the face of a… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • falconiform — /fawl koh neuh fawrm , fal , faw koh , fawl keuh neuh , fal , faw keuh /, adj. of, pertaining to, or belonging to the order Falconiformes, comprising the vultures, hawks, eagles, ospreys, falcons, caracaras, etc. [ < NL falconiformes; see FALCON …   Universalium

  • List of broad gauge (7 feet) railway locomotive names — This is a list of the names of broad gauge railway locomotives built in the United Kingdom during the heyday of that gauge (which ended in that country by 1892 with the final triumph of standard gauge). Throughout the history of railways many… …   Wikipedia

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