Haranguing
Harangue Ha*rangue", v. i. [imp. & p. p. {Harangued} (h[.a]*r[a^]ngd"); p. pr. & vb. n. {Haranguing}.] [Cf. F. haranguer, It. aringare.] To make an harangue; to declaim. [1913 Webster]

The Collaborative International Dictionary of English. 2000.

Look at other dictionaries:

  • haranguing — ha·rangue || hÉ™ ræŋ n. passionate or pompous speech; lecture, scolding v. make a passionate or pompous speech; lecture, scold …   English contemporary dictionary

  • harangue — I. noun Etymology: Middle French arenge, from Old Italian aringa, from aringare to speak in public, from aringo public assembly, of Germanic origin; akin to Old High German hring ring Date: circa 1533 1. a speech addressed to a public assembly 2 …   New Collegiate Dictionary

  • harangue — [[t]həræ̱ŋ[/t]] harangues, haranguing, harangued 1) VERB If someone harangues you, they try to persuade you to accept their opinions or ideas in a forceful way. [V n] An argument ensued, with various band members joining in and haranguing Simpson …   English dictionary

  • Declamation — Dec la*ma tion, n. [L. declamatio, from declamare: cf. F. d[ e]clamation. See {Declaim}.] 1. The act or art of declaiming; rhetorical delivery; haranguing; loud speaking in public; especially, the public recitation of speeches as an exercise in… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Harangue — Ha*rangue , v. i. [imp. & p. p. {Harangued} (h[.a]*r[a^]ngd ); p. pr. & vb. n. {Haranguing}.] [Cf. F. haranguer, It. aringare.] To make an harangue; to declaim. [1913 Webster] …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Harangued — Harangue Ha*rangue , v. i. [imp. & p. p. {Harangued} (h[.a]*r[a^]ngd ); p. pr. & vb. n. {Haranguing}.] [Cf. F. haranguer, It. aringare.] To make an harangue; to declaim. [1913 Webster] …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Haranguer — Ha*rang uer (h[.a]*r[a^]ng [ e]r), n. One who harangues, or is fond of haranguing; a declaimer. [1913 Webster] With them join d all th haranguers of the throng, That thought to get preferment by the tongue. Dryden. [1913 Webster] …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Campaign for Nuclear Disarmament — CND redirects here. For other uses, see CND (disambiguation). The CND symbol, designed by Gerald Holtom in 1958. It later became a universal peace symbol used in many different versions worldwide.[1] …   Wikipedia

  • Emmeline Pankhurst — (c. 1913) Born 15 July 1858 Moss Side, Manchester, England, United Kingdom Died 14 June 1928 (aged 69) …   Wikipedia

  • My Disillusionment in Russia —   Author(s) …   Wikipedia

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