Hag moth
Hag Hag (h[a^]g), n. [OE. hagge, hegge, witch, hag, AS. h[ae]gtesse; akin to OHG. hagazussa, G. hexe, D. heks, Dan. hex, Sw. h["a]xa. The first part of the word is prob. the same as E. haw, hedge, and the orig. meaning was perh., wood woman, wild woman. [root]12.] 1. A witch, sorceress, or enchantress; also, a wizard. [Obs.] ``[Silenus] that old hag.'' --Golding. [1913 Webster]

2. An ugly old woman. --Dryden. [1913 Webster]

3. A fury; a she-monster. --Crashaw. [1913 Webster]

4. (Zo["o]l.) An eel-like marine marsipobranch ({Myxine glutinosa}), allied to the lamprey. It has a suctorial mouth, with labial appendages, and a single pair of gill openings. It is the type of the order {Hyperotreta}. Called also {hagfish}, {borer}, {slime eel}, {sucker}, and {sleepmarken}. [1913 Webster]

5. (Zo["o]l.) The hagdon or shearwater. [1913 Webster]

6. An appearance of light and fire on a horse's mane or a man's hair. --Blount. [1913 Webster]

{Hag moth} (Zo["o]l.), a moth ({Phobetron pithecium}), the larva of which has curious side appendages, and feeds on fruit trees.

{Hag's tooth} (Naut.), an ugly irregularity in the pattern of matting or pointing. [1913 Webster]


The Collaborative International Dictionary of English. 2000.

Look at other dictionaries:

  • hag moth — noun Etymology: hag (I) : a No. American eucleid moth (Phobetron pithecium) whose larva feeds on trees and shrubs * * * hag moth, a North American moth whose larva has curious hairy appendages somewhat suggesting disheveled locks of hair. It… …   Useful english dictionary

  • Hag — (h[a^]g), n. [OE. hagge, hegge, witch, hag, AS. h[ae]gtesse; akin to OHG. hagazussa, G. hexe, D. heks, Dan. hex, Sw. h[ a]xa. The first part of the word is prob. the same as E. haw, hedge, and the orig. meaning was perh., wood woman, wild woman.… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Hag's tooth — Hag Hag (h[a^]g), n. [OE. hagge, hegge, witch, hag, AS. h[ae]gtesse; akin to OHG. hagazussa, G. hexe, D. heks, Dan. hex, Sw. h[ a]xa. The first part of the word is prob. the same as E. haw, hedge, and the orig. meaning was perh., wood woman, wild …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • MOTH — (Heb. עָשׁ, ash and סָס, sas; AV, JPS – worm ), insect said to eat and destroy clothes (Isa. 51:8; cf. 50:9; Job 13:28). The word ash is also used as a synonym for disintegration and   destruction (Hos. 5:12; Ps. 39:12). These names refer to the… …   Encyclopedia of Judaism

  • slug caterpillar moth — ▪ insect       any of approximately 1,000 species of insects (order Lepidoptera) that are widely distributed throughout the world but are concentrated in the tropics. These moths are named after their short, fleshy, sluglike caterpillars. In the… …   Universalium

  • night moth — Night Night (n[imac]t), n. [OE. night, niht, AS. neaht, niht; akin to D. nacht, OS. & OHG. naht, G. nacht, Icel. n[=o]tt, Sw. natt, Dan. nat, Goth. nahts, Lith. naktis, Russ. noche, W. nos, Ir. nochd, L. nox, noctis, Gr. ny x, nykto s, Skr. nakta …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Night hag — Night Night (n[imac]t), n. [OE. night, niht, AS. neaht, niht; akin to D. nacht, OS. & OHG. naht, G. nacht, Icel. n[=o]tt, Sw. natt, Dan. nat, Goth. nahts, Lith. naktis, Russ. noche, W. nos, Ir. nochd, L. nox, noctis, Gr. ny x, nykto s, Skr. nakta …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • borer — Hag Hag (h[a^]g), n. [OE. hagge, hegge, witch, hag, AS. h[ae]gtesse; akin to OHG. hagazussa, G. hexe, D. heks, Dan. hex, Sw. h[ a]xa. The first part of the word is prob. the same as E. haw, hedge, and the orig. meaning was perh., wood woman, wild …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • hagfish — Hag Hag (h[a^]g), n. [OE. hagge, hegge, witch, hag, AS. h[ae]gtesse; akin to OHG. hagazussa, G. hexe, D. heks, Dan. hex, Sw. h[ a]xa. The first part of the word is prob. the same as E. haw, hedge, and the orig. meaning was perh., wood woman, wild …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Myxine glutinosa — Hag Hag (h[a^]g), n. [OE. hagge, hegge, witch, hag, AS. h[ae]gtesse; akin to OHG. hagazussa, G. hexe, D. heks, Dan. hex, Sw. h[ a]xa. The first part of the word is prob. the same as E. haw, hedge, and the orig. meaning was perh., wood woman, wild …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

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