Graspable Grasp"a*ble, a. Capable of being grasped. [1913 Webster]

The Collaborative International Dictionary of English. 2000.

Look at other dictionaries:

  • graspable — grasp ► VERB 1) seize and hold firmly. 2) comprehend fully. ► NOUN 1) a firm grip. 2) a person s capacity to attain or understand something. DERIVATIVES graspable adjective grasper noun …   English terms dictionary

  • graspable — adjective see grasp I …   New Collegiate Dictionary

  • graspable — adjective a) Able to be grasped b) Able to be understood or comprehended; understandable …   Wiktionary

  • graspable — adj. able to be grasped; comprehensible, understandable …   English contemporary dictionary

  • graspable — grasp·able …   English syllables

  • graspable — adjective capable of being apprehended or understood • Syn: ↑apprehensible, ↑intelligible, ↑perceivable, ↑understandable • Similar to: ↑comprehensible, ↑comprehendible • …   Useful english dictionary

  • grasp — graspable, adj. grasper, n. graspless, adj. /grasp, grahsp/, v.t. 1. to seize and hold by or as if by clasping with the fingers or arms. 2. to seize upon; hold firmly. 3. to get hold of mentally; comprehend; understand: I don t grasp your meaning …   Universalium

  • Hegel’s logic and philosophy of mind — Willem deVries LOGIC AND MIND IN HEGEL’S PHILOSOPHY Hegel is above all a systematic philosopher. Awe inspiring in its scope, his philosophy left no subject untouched. Logic provides the central, unifying framework as well as the general… …   History of philosophy

  • lithe — adjective Etymology: Middle English, from Old English līthe gentle; akin to Old High German lindi gentle, Latin lentus slow Date: 14th century 1. easily bent or flexed < lithe steel > < a lithe vine > 2. characterized by easy flexibility and… …   New Collegiate Dictionary

  • grasp — I. verb Etymology: Middle English graspen Date: 14th century intransitive verb to make the motion of seizing ; clutch transitive verb 1. to take or seize eagerly 2. to clasp or embrace especially with the fingers or arms 3. to lay hold of with… …   New Collegiate Dictionary

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