Glozing
Gloze Gloze, v. i. [imp. & p. p. {Glozed}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Glozing}.] [OE. glosen, F. gloser. See {gloss} explanation.] [1913 Webster] 1. To flatter; to wheedle; to fawn; to talk smoothly. --Chaucer. [1913 Webster]

A false, glozing parasite. --South. [1913 Webster]

So glozed the tempter, and his proem tuned. --Milton. [1913 Webster]

2. To give a specious or false meaning; to ministerpret. --Shak. [1913 Webster]


The Collaborative International Dictionary of English. 2000.

Look at other dictionaries:

  • glozing — adjective Etymology: Middle English glosinge, glosing, from glosen to flatter + inge, ing ing archaic : fawning, flattering …   Useful english dictionary

  • Gloze — Gloze, v. i. [imp. & p. p. {Glozed}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Glozing}.] [OE. glosen, F. gloser. See {gloss} explanation.] [1913 Webster] 1. To flatter; to wheedle; to fawn; to talk smoothly. Chaucer. [1913 Webster] A false, glozing parasite. South.… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Glozed — Gloze Gloze, v. i. [imp. & p. p. {Glozed}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Glozing}.] [OE. glosen, F. gloser. See {gloss} explanation.] [1913 Webster] 1. To flatter; to wheedle; to fawn; to talk smoothly. Chaucer. [1913 Webster] A false, glozing parasite. South …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • gloze — I. transitive verb (glozed; glozing) Etymology: Middle English glosen to gloss, flatter, from glose gloss Date: 14th century archaic gloss IV,1 II. transitive verb (glozed; glozing) Date: 14th century …   New Collegiate Dictionary

  • Gloze — Gloze, v. t. To smooth over; to palliate. [1913 Webster] By glozing the evil that is in the world. I. Taylor. [1913 Webster] …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Sardonic — Sar*don ic, a. [F. sardonique, L. sardonius, Gr. ?, ?, perhaps fr. ? to grin like a dog, or from a certain plant of Sardinia, Gr. ?, which was said to screw up the face of the eater.] Forced; unnatural; insincere; hence, derisive, mocking,… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Sardonic grin — Sardonic Sar*don ic, a. [F. sardonique, L. sardonius, Gr. ?, ?, perhaps fr. ? to grin like a dog, or from a certain plant of Sardinia, Gr. ?, which was said to screw up the face of the eater.] Forced; unnatural; insincere; hence, derisive,… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Sardonic laugh — Sardonic Sar*don ic, a. [F. sardonique, L. sardonius, Gr. ?, ?, perhaps fr. ? to grin like a dog, or from a certain plant of Sardinia, Gr. ?, which was said to screw up the face of the eater.] Forced; unnatural; insincere; hence, derisive,… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Transgress — Trans*gress , v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Transgressed}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Transgressing}.] [Cf. F. transgresser. See {Transgression}.] 1. To pass over or beyond; to surpass. [R.] [1913 Webster] Surpassing common faith, transgressing nature s law. Dryden …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Transgressed — Transgress Trans*gress , v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Transgressed}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Transgressing}.] [Cf. F. transgresser. See {Transgression}.] 1. To pass over or beyond; to surpass. [R.] [1913 Webster] Surpassing common faith, transgressing nature s… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

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