Gloomed
Gloom Gloom, v. i. [imp. & p. p. {Gloomed}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Glooming}.] 1. To shine or appear obscurely or imperfectly; to glimmer. [1913 Webster]

2. To become dark or dim; to be or appear dismal, gloomy, or sad; to come to the evening twilight. [1913 Webster]

The black gibbet glooms beside the way. --Goldsmith. [1913 Webster]

[This weary day] . . . at last I see it gloom. --Spenser. [1913 Webster]


The Collaborative International Dictionary of English. 2000.

Look at other dictionaries:

  • gloomed — gluːm n. darkness, dimness; sadness, depression, melancholy v. act depressed, be gloomy, be sad; become dark, become dim …   English contemporary dictionary

  • Gloom — Gloom, v. t. 1. To render gloomy or dark; to obscure; to darken. [1913 Webster] A bow window . . . gloomed with limes. Walpole. [1913 Webster] A black yew gloomed the stagnant air. Tennyson. [1913 Webster] 2. To fill with gloom; to make sad,… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Gloom — Gloom, v. i. [imp. & p. p. {Gloomed}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Glooming}.] 1. To shine or appear obscurely or imperfectly; to glimmer. [1913 Webster] 2. To become dark or dim; to be or appear dismal, gloomy, or sad; to come to the evening twilight. [1913 …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Glooming — Gloom Gloom, v. i. [imp. & p. p. {Gloomed}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Glooming}.] 1. To shine or appear obscurely or imperfectly; to glimmer. [1913 Webster] 2. To become dark or dim; to be or appear dismal, gloomy, or sad; to come to the evening twilight …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • John Locke (poet) — Early life= The Poet of Ireland in Exile [http://www.visitcallan.ie/html/about/people.html] John Locke (poet), Fenian activist and writer, was born in 1847 in Minauns, Callan, County Kilkenny.When in school John used to write verses of poetry on… …   Wikipedia

  • gloom — 1. noun a) darkness, dimness or obscurity. Here was a surprise, and a sad one for me, for I perceived that I had slept away a day, and that the sun was setting for another night. And yet it mattered little, for night or daytime there was no light …   Wiktionary

  • frown — vb Frown, scowl, glower, lower, gloom are comparable when they mean to put on a dark or malignant countenance or aspect. Frown commonly implies a stern face and contracted brows that express displeasure, disapprobation, anger, or contempt {that… …   New Dictionary of Synonyms

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