Gall
Gall Gall (g[add]l), n. [F. galle, noix de galle, fr. L. galla.] (Zo["o]l.) An excrescence of any form produced on any part of a plant by insects or their larvae. They are most commonly caused by small Hymenoptera and Diptera which puncture the bark and lay their eggs in the wounds. The larvae live within the galls. Some galls are due to aphids, mites, etc. See {Gallnut}. [1913 Webster]

Note: The galls, or gallnuts, of commerce are produced by insects of the genus {Cynips}, chiefly on an oak ({Quercus infectoria} syn. {Quercus Lusitanica}) of Western Asia and Southern Europe. They contain much tannin, and are used in the manufacture of that article and for making ink and a black dye, as well as in medicine. [1913 Webster]

{Gall insect} (Zo["o]l.), any insect that produces galls.

{Gall midge} (Zo["o]l.), any small dipterous insect that produces galls.

{Gall oak}, the oak ({Quercus infectoria}) which yields the galls of commerce.

{Gall of glass}, the neutral salt skimmed off from the surface of melted crown glass;- called also {glass gall} and {sandiver}. --Ure.

{Gall wasp}. (Zo["o]l.) See {Gallfly}. [1913 Webster]


The Collaborative International Dictionary of English. 2000.

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  • Gall — ist ein Familienname: Gall (Indianerhäuptling) ( 1840–1894), Kriegshäuptling der nordamerikanischen Hunkpapa Lakotas Bernd Erich Gall (* 1956), deutscher Maler und Konzeptkünstler Berthold R. Gall (* 1947), deutscher Politiker (CDU) Dorothee Gall …   Deutsch Wikipedia

  • Gall — (g[add]l), n.[OE. galle, gal, AS. gealla; akin to D. gal, OS. & OHG. galla, Icel. gall, SW. galla, Dan. galde, L. fel, Gr. ?, and prob. to E. yellow. [root]49. See {Yellow}, and cf. {Choler}] 1. (Physiol.) The bitter, alkaline, viscid fluid found …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • gall — gall·acetophenone; gall·anilide; gall; gall·ber·ry; mc·dou·gall; gall·anilid; gall·ing·ly; gall·ing·ness; …   English syllables

  • gall — ‘bile’ [12], and by metaphorical extension ‘bitterness’ and ‘effrontery’, was borrowed from Old Norse gall. It gets its name ultimately from its colour, for its prehistoric Germanic ancestor *gallam or *gallon (which also produced German galle… …   The Hutchinson dictionary of word origins

  • gall — ‘bile’ [12], and by metaphorical extension ‘bitterness’ and ‘effrontery’, was borrowed from Old Norse gall. It gets its name ultimately from its colour, for its prehistoric Germanic ancestor *gallam or *gallon (which also produced German galle… …   Word origins

  • Gall — Gall, v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Galled} (g[add]ld); p. pr. & vb. n. {Galling}.] [OE. gallen; cf. F. galer to scratch, rub, gale scurf, scab, G. galle a disease in horses feet, an excrescence under the tongue of horses; of uncertain origin. Cf. {Gall}… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • gall — Ⅰ. gall [1] ► NOUN 1) bold and impudent behaviour. 2) bitterness or cruelty. 3) an animal s gall bladder. 4) archaic the contents of the gall bladder; bile. ORIGIN Old English. Ⅱ …   English terms dictionary

  • Gall — (Franz Josef) (1758 1828) médecin allemand. Fondateur de la phrénologie, il étudia les fonctions du cerveau et leurs localisations. Gall (saint) (v. 550 645) moine irlandais. Venu évangéliser le continent, il résida en Haute Saône (France), puis… …   Encyclopédie Universelle

  • gall — [n] nerve, brashness acrimony, animosity, arrogance, bitterness, brass, brazenness, cheek*, chutzpah*, conceit, confidence, crust cynicism, effrontery, guts*, haughtiness, hostility, impertinence, impudence, insolence, malevolence, malice,… …   New thesaurus

  • Gall — Gall, v. i. To scoff; to jeer. [R.] Shak. [1913 Webster] …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

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