Gaggled
Gaggle Gag"gle (g[a^]g"g'l), v. i. [imp. & p. p. {Gaggled}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Gaggling}.] [Of imitative origin; cf. D. gaggelen, gagelen, G. gackeln, gackern, MHG. g[=a]gen, E. giggle, cackle.] To make a noise like a goose; to cackle. --Bacon. [1913 Webster]

The Collaborative International Dictionary of English. 2000.

Look at other dictionaries:

  • gaggled — gag·gle || gægl n. flock of geese; group of women (derogatory); goose s cry v. cackle (geese); chitchat, talk (derogatory about women) …   English contemporary dictionary

  • Gaggle — Gag gle (g[a^]g g l), v. i. [imp. & p. p. {Gaggled}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Gaggling}.] [Of imitative origin; cf. D. gaggelen, gagelen, G. gackeln, gackern, MHG. g[=a]gen, E. giggle, cackle.] To make a noise like a goose; to cackle. Bacon. [1913… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Gaggling — Gaggle Gag gle (g[a^]g g l), v. i. [imp. & p. p. {Gaggled}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Gaggling}.] [Of imitative origin; cf. D. gaggelen, gagelen, G. gackeln, gackern, MHG. g[=a]gen, E. giggle, cackle.] To make a noise like a goose; to cackle. Bacon. [1913 …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Old English (Ireland) — This article is about 12th century Germanic settlers of Ireland. For the ca. 5th century Germanic settlers of England, see Anglo Saxons. The Old English (Irish: Seanghaill, meaning old foreigners ) were the descendants of the settlers who came to …   Wikipedia

  • gaggle — /gag euhl/, v., gaggled, gaggling, n. v.i. 1. to cackle. n. 2. a flock of geese when not flying. Cf. skein. 3. an often noisy or disorderly group or gathering: a politician followed by a gaggle of supporters. 4. an assortment of related things.… …   Universalium

  • gaggle — /ˈgægəl / (say gaguhl) verb (i) (gaggled, gaggling) 1. to cackle. –noun 2. a flock of geese. 3. any disorderly group. 4. a cackle. {imitative} …   Australian English dictionary

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