Frow
Frow Frow, n. [Cf. {Frower}.] A cleaving tool with handle at right angles to the blade, for splitting cask staves and shingles from the block; a frower. [1913 Webster]

The Collaborative International Dictionary of English. 2000.

Look at other dictionaries:

  • frow — frow·er; frow·sy; frow·zled; frow; frow·zly; frow·zy; …   English syllables

  • Frow — Frow, n. [D. vrouw; akin to G. frau woman, wife, goth, fr[ a]uja master, lord, AS. fre[ a].] 1. A woman; especially, a Dutch or German woman. Beau. & Fl. [1913 Webster] 2. A dirty woman; a slattern. [Prov. Eng.] Halliwell. [1913 Webster] …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Frow — Frow, a. Brittle. [Obs.] Evelyn. [1913 Webster] …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • frow — Dutchwoman, late 14c., from M.Du. vrouwe (Du. vrow), cognate with Ger. Frau (see FRAU (Cf. frau)) …   Etymology dictionary

  • frow — [frō] n. FROE …   English World dictionary

  • Frow — This unusual name is of Anglo Saxon origin, and is a short form of one of the variant surnames generated by the Old English pre 7th Century personal name Freowine , in Middle English Frewine . The modern surnames from this source range from… …   Surnames reference

  • frow — variant of froe …   New Collegiate Dictionary

  • frow — /froh/, n. a cleaving tool having a wedge shaped blade, with a handle set at right angles to it. Also, froe. [1615 25; earlier frower, perh. n. use of FROWARD in literal sense turned away ] * * * …   Universalium

  • frow — or froe [[t]froʊ[/t]] n. bui a cleaving tool having a wedge shaped blade, with a handle set at right angles to it • Etymology: 1615–25; earlier frower …   From formal English to slang

  • frow —  1) loose, spongy, brittle ; frough wood, brittle wood. N.  2) brittle. Berks. See FROUGH …   A glossary of provincial and local words used in England

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