Angle An"gle ([a^][ng]"g'l), n. [F. angle, L. angulus angle, corner; akin to uncus hook, Gr. 'agky`los bent, crooked, angular, 'a`gkos a bend or hollow, AS. angel hook, fish-hook, G. angel, and F. anchor.] 1. The inclosed space near the point where two lines meet; a corner; a nook. [1913 Webster]

Into the utmost angle of the world. --Spenser. [1913 Webster]

To search the tenderest angles of the heart. --Milton. [1913 Webster]

2. (Geom.) (a) The figure made by. two lines which meet. (b) The difference of direction of two lines. In the lines meet, the point of meeting is the vertex of the angle. [1913 Webster]

3. A projecting or sharp corner; an angular fragment. [1913 Webster]

Though but an angle reached him of the stone. --Dryden. [1913 Webster]

4. (Astrol.) A name given to four of the twelve astrological ``houses.'' [Obs.] --Chaucer. [1913 Webster]

5. [AS. angel.] A fishhook; tackle for catching fish, consisting of a line, hook, and bait, with or without a rod. [1913 Webster]

Give me mine angle: we 'll to the river there. --Shak. [1913 Webster]

A fisher next his trembling angle bears. --Pope. [1913 Webster]

{Acute angle}, one less than a right angle, or less than 90[deg].

{Adjacent} or {Contiguous angles}, such as have one leg common to both angles.

{Alternate angles}. See {Alternate}.

{Angle bar}. (a) (Carp.) An upright bar at the angle where two faces of a polygonal or bay window meet. --Knight. (b) (Mach.) Same as {Angle iron}.

{Angle bead} (Arch.), a bead worked on or fixed to the angle of any architectural work, esp. for protecting an angle of a wall.

{Angle brace}, {Angle tie} (Carp.), a brace across an interior angle of a wooden frame, forming the hypothenuse and securing the two side pieces together. --Knight.

{Angle iron} (Mach.), a rolled bar or plate of iron having one or more angles, used for forming the corners, or connecting or sustaining the sides of an iron structure to which it is riveted.

{Angle leaf} (Arch.), a detail in the form of a leaf, more or less conventionalized, used to decorate and sometimes to strengthen an angle.

{Angle meter}, an instrument for measuring angles, esp. for ascertaining the dip of strata.

{Angle shaft} (Arch.), an enriched angle bead, often having a capital or base, or both.

{Curvilineal angle}, one formed by two curved lines.

{External angles}, angles formed by the sides of any right-lined figure, when the sides are produced or lengthened.

{Facial angle}. See under {Facial}.

{Internal angles}, those which are within any right-lined figure.

{Mixtilineal angle}, one formed by a right line with a curved line.

{Oblique angle}, one acute or obtuse, in opposition to a right angle.

{Obtuse angle}, one greater than a right angle, or more than 90[deg].

{Optic angle}. See under {Optic}.

{Rectilineal} or {Right-lined angle}, one formed by two right lines.

{Right angle}, one formed by a right line falling on another perpendicularly, or an angle of 90[deg] (measured by a quarter circle).

{Solid angle}, the figure formed by the meeting of three or more plane angles at one point.

{Spherical angle}, one made by the meeting of two arcs of great circles, which mutually cut one another on the surface of a globe or sphere.

{Visual angle}, the angle formed by two rays of light, or two straight lines drawn from the extreme points of an object to the center of the eye.

{For Angles of commutation}, {draught}, {incidence}, {reflection}, {refraction}, {position}, {repose}, {fraction}, see {Commutation}, {Draught}, {Incidence}, {Reflection}, {Refraction}, etc. [1913 Webster]

The Collaborative International Dictionary of English. 2000.

(of two lines), , , / , , , , , , (where two lines meet) / , , (with a rod),

Look at other dictionaries:

  • angle — [ ɑ̃gl ] n. m. • XIIe; lat. angulus 1 ♦ Cour. Saillant ou rentrant formé par deux lignes ou deux surfaces qui se coupent. ⇒ arête, coin, encoignure, renfoncement. À l angle de la rue. Former un angle, être en angle. La maison qui fait l angle,… …   Encyclopédie Universelle

  • angle — ANGLE. s. m. Inclination de deux lignes qui aboutissent a un mesme point. Angle droit. angle aigu. angle obtus. angle de tant de degrez. cette muraille fait un grand angle. angle saillant. angle rentrant. l angle du centre. l angle de la… …   Dictionnaire de l'Académie française

  • angle — ANGLE. s. m. Ouverture de deux lignes qui se rencontrent. Angle droit. Angle aigu. Angle obtus. Angle de quarante cinq degrés. Angle de cent degrés. Angle saillant. Angle rentrant. Une figure à plusieurs angles. [b]f♛/b] On dit aussi, Les angles… …   Dictionnaire de l'Académie Française 1798

  • angle — m. angle. Angle maigre : angle aigu. Géom. > Angle agut, obtùs, drech : angle aigu, obtus, droit. voir motut …   Diccionari Personau e Evolutiu

  • angle — angle1 [aŋ′gəl] n. [ME & OFr < L angulus, a corner, angle < Gr ankylos, bent, crooked: see ANKLE] 1. a) the shape made by two straight lines meeting at a common point, the vertex, or by two planes meeting along an edge: see DIHEDRAL,… …   English World dictionary

  • Angle — An gle, v. i. [imp. & p. p. {Angled}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Angling}.] 1. To fish with an angle (fishhook), or with hook and line. [1913 Webster] 2. To use some bait or artifice; to intrigue; to scheme; as, to angle for praise. [1913 Webster] The… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Angle — ist der Name folgender Personen: Edward H. Angle (1855–1930), US amerikanischer Orthodontist Kurt Angle (* 1968), US amerikanischer Wrestler Sharron Angle (* 1949), US amerikanische Politikerin Diese Seite ist eine …   Deutsch Wikipedia

  • Angle — member of a Teutonic tribe, Old English, from L. Angli the Angles, lit. people of Angul (O.N. Öngull), a region in what is now Holstein, said to be so called for its hook like shape (see ANGLE (Cf. angle) (n.)). People from the tribe there… …   Etymology dictionary

  • angle — noun. This word had been used since the 1870s in the meaning ‘the aspect from which a matter is considered’ • (The old stagers…the men who knew all the angles, who had great experience Nevil Shute, 1944) often with a defining word: the OED gives… …   Modern English usage

  • angle — [n1] shape formed by two lines meeting at a point bend, corner, crook, crotch, cusp, decline, divergence, dogleg, edge, elbow, flare, flection, flexure, fork, incline, intersection, knee, nook, notch, obliquity, point, slant, turn, turning, twist …   New thesaurus

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