Frame Frame, n. 1. Anything composed of parts fitted and united together; a fabric; a structure; esp., the constructional system, whether of timber or metal, that gives to a building, vessel, etc., its model and strength; the skeleton of a structure. [1913 Webster]

These are thy glorious works, Parent of good, Almighty! thine this universal frame. --Milton. [1913 Webster]

2. The bodily structure; physical constitution; make or build of a person. [1913 Webster]

Some bloody passion shakes your very frame. --Shak. [1913 Webster]

No frames could be strong enough to endure it. --Prescott. [1913 Webster]

3. A kind of open case or structure made for admitting, inclosing, or supporting things, as that which incloses or contains a window, door, picture, etc.; that on which anything is held or stretched; as: (a) The skeleton structure which supports the boiler and machinery of a locomotive upon its wheels. (b) (Founding) A molding box or flask, which being filled with sand serves as a mold for castings. (c) The ribs and stretchers of an umbrella or other structure with a fabric covering. (d) A structure of four bars, adjustable in size, on which cloth, etc., is stretched for quilting, embroidery, etc. (e) (Hort.) A glazed portable structure for protecting young plants from frost. (f) (Print.) A stand to support the type cases for use by the compositor. (f) a pair of glasses without the lenses; that part of a pair of glasses that excludes the lenses. [1913 Webster +PJC]

4. (Mach.) A term applied, especially in England, to certain machines built upon or within framework; as, a stocking frame; lace frame; spinning frame, etc. [1913 Webster]

5. Form; shape; proportion; scheme; structure; constitution; system; as, a frameof government. [1913 Webster]

She that hath a heart of that fine frame To pay this debt of love but to a brother. --Shak. [1913 Webster]

Put your discourse into some frame. --Shak. [1913 Webster]

6. Particular state or disposition, as of the mind; humor; temper; mood; as, to be always in a happy frame. Same as {{frame of mind}} [1913 Webster +PJC]

7. Contrivance; the act of devising or scheming. [Obs.] [1913 Webster]

John the bastard Whose spirits toil in frame of villainies. --Shak. [1913 Webster]

8. In games: (a) In pool, the triangular form used in setting up the balls; also, the balls as set up, or the round of playing required to pocket them all; as, to play six frames in a game of 50 points. (b) In bowling, as in tenpins, one of the several innings forming a game. [Webster 1913 Suppl.]

{Balloon frame}, {Cant frames}, etc. See under {Balloon}, {Cant}, etc.

{Frame building} or {Frame house}, a building of which the form and support is made of framed timbers. [U.S.] -- {Frame level}, a mason's level.

{Frame saw}, a thin saw stretched in a frame to give it rigidity. [1913 Webster]

The Collaborative International Dictionary of English. 2000.


Look at other dictionaries:

  • Frame — ist in der Hauptbedeutung ein vom englischen Wort frame (dt.: Rahmen, Gestell) stammendes Fremdwort, das in verschiedenen Zusammenhängen verwendet wird: als Abstraktum: den sichtbaren Bildausschnitt eines Films Einzelbilder in Filmen, Animationen …   Deutsch Wikipedia

  • frame — [frām] vt. framed, framing [ME framen < frame, a structure, frame, prob. < ON frami, profit, benefit, akin to frama, to further < fram, forward (akin to OE fram, FROM); some senses < OE framian, to be helpful: see FURNISH] 1. to shape …   English World dictionary

  • Frame — Frame, v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Framed}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Framing}.] [OE. framen, fremen, to execute, build, AS. fremman to further, perform, effect, fr. fram strong, valiant; akin to E. foremost, and prob. to AS. fram from, Icel. fremja, frama, to… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Frame — is generally accepted as being of Scottish origin although this is by no means certain. It is believed to derive from the Olde English pre 7th century word fram a term for a lusty and vigorous man! Today Frame is fairly prevalent on the western… …   Surnames reference

  • frame — ► NOUN 1) a rigid structure surrounding a picture, door, etc. 2) (frames) a metal or plastic structure holding the lenses of a pair of glasses. 3) the rigid supporting structure of a vehicle, piece of furniture, or other object. 4) a person s… …   English terms dictionary

  • frame — vt framed, fram·ing 1: to formulate the contents of and draw up (as a document) in the two hundred years since our Constitution was framed W. J. Brennan, Jr. 2: to contrive the evidence against (as an innocent person) so that a verdict of guilty… …   Law dictionary

  • frame — frame, framing, frame analysis In Frame Analysis (1974), Erving Goffman defines a ‘frame’ as ‘definitions of the situation [that] are built up in accordance with the principles of organization which govern events at least social ones and our… …   Dictionary of sociology

  • Frame — Saltar a navegación, búsqueda Se denomina frame en inglés, a un fotograma o cuadro, una imagen particular dentro de una sucesión de imágenes que componen una animación. La continua sucesión de estos fotogramas producen a la vista la sensación de… …   Wikipedia Español

  • Frame — Frame, v. i. 1. To shape; to arrange, as the organs of speech. [Obs.] Judg. xii. 6. [1913 Webster] 2. To proceed; to go. [Obs.] [1913 Webster] The bauty of this sinful dame Made many princes thither frame. Shak. [1913 Webster] …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • frame — (izg. frȇjm) m DEFINICIJA 1. inform. u komunikaciji, paket informacija koji se kroz mrežu prenosi kao cjelina 2. int. dio Internet stranice koji predstavlja zasebnu cjelinu, no može mu se pristupiti isključivo preko glavne stranice; obično se… …   Hrvatski jezični portal

Share the article and excerpts

Direct link
Do a right-click on the link above
and select “Copy Link”