fraction
Angle An"gle ([a^][ng]"g'l), n. [F. angle, L. angulus angle, corner; akin to uncus hook, Gr. 'agky`los bent, crooked, angular, 'a`gkos a bend or hollow, AS. angel hook, fish-hook, G. angel, and F. anchor.] 1. The inclosed space near the point where two lines meet; a corner; a nook. [1913 Webster]

Into the utmost angle of the world. --Spenser. [1913 Webster]

To search the tenderest angles of the heart. --Milton. [1913 Webster]

2. (Geom.) (a) The figure made by. two lines which meet. (b) The difference of direction of two lines. In the lines meet, the point of meeting is the vertex of the angle. [1913 Webster]

3. A projecting or sharp corner; an angular fragment. [1913 Webster]

Though but an angle reached him of the stone. --Dryden. [1913 Webster]

4. (Astrol.) A name given to four of the twelve astrological ``houses.'' [Obs.] --Chaucer. [1913 Webster]

5. [AS. angel.] A fishhook; tackle for catching fish, consisting of a line, hook, and bait, with or without a rod. [1913 Webster]

Give me mine angle: we 'll to the river there. --Shak. [1913 Webster]

A fisher next his trembling angle bears. --Pope. [1913 Webster]

{Acute angle}, one less than a right angle, or less than 90[deg].

{Adjacent} or {Contiguous angles}, such as have one leg common to both angles.

{Alternate angles}. See {Alternate}.

{Angle bar}. (a) (Carp.) An upright bar at the angle where two faces of a polygonal or bay window meet. --Knight. (b) (Mach.) Same as {Angle iron}.

{Angle bead} (Arch.), a bead worked on or fixed to the angle of any architectural work, esp. for protecting an angle of a wall.

{Angle brace}, {Angle tie} (Carp.), a brace across an interior angle of a wooden frame, forming the hypothenuse and securing the two side pieces together. --Knight.

{Angle iron} (Mach.), a rolled bar or plate of iron having one or more angles, used for forming the corners, or connecting or sustaining the sides of an iron structure to which it is riveted.

{Angle leaf} (Arch.), a detail in the form of a leaf, more or less conventionalized, used to decorate and sometimes to strengthen an angle.

{Angle meter}, an instrument for measuring angles, esp. for ascertaining the dip of strata.

{Angle shaft} (Arch.), an enriched angle bead, often having a capital or base, or both.

{Curvilineal angle}, one formed by two curved lines.

{External angles}, angles formed by the sides of any right-lined figure, when the sides are produced or lengthened.

{Facial angle}. See under {Facial}.

{Internal angles}, those which are within any right-lined figure.

{Mixtilineal angle}, one formed by a right line with a curved line.

{Oblique angle}, one acute or obtuse, in opposition to a right angle.

{Obtuse angle}, one greater than a right angle, or more than 90[deg].

{Optic angle}. See under {Optic}.

{Rectilineal} or {Right-lined angle}, one formed by two right lines.

{Right angle}, one formed by a right line falling on another perpendicularly, or an angle of 90[deg] (measured by a quarter circle).

{Solid angle}, the figure formed by the meeting of three or more plane angles at one point.

{Spherical angle}, one made by the meeting of two arcs of great circles, which mutually cut one another on the surface of a globe or sphere.

{Visual angle}, the angle formed by two rays of light, or two straight lines drawn from the extreme points of an object to the center of the eye.

{For Angles of commutation}, {draught}, {incidence}, {reflection}, {refraction}, {position}, {repose}, {fraction}, see {Commutation}, {Draught}, {Incidence}, {Reflection}, {Refraction}, etc. [1913 Webster]


The Collaborative International Dictionary of English. 2000.

Synonyms:

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  • fraction — [ fraksjɔ̃ ] n. f. • 1187; « rupture » v. 1400; bas lat. fractio, de frangere « briser » I ♦ Liturg. La fraction du pain : action de rompre le pain eucharistique avant de communier. II ♦ 1 ♦ (1538) Math. Nombre rationnel, élément de l ensemble Q …   Encyclopédie Universelle

  • Fraction — Frac tion, n. [F. fraction, L. fractio a breaking, fr. frangere, fractum, to break. See {Break}.] 1. The act of breaking, or state of being broken, especially by violence. [Obs.] [1913 Webster] Neither can the natural body of Christ be subject to …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • fraction — Fraction. subst. fem. Action par laquelle on rompt. En ce sens il n a d usage qu en certaines phrases consacrées. Les Pelerins d Emaüs connurent nostre Seigneur à la fraction du pain. le corps de Jesus Christ n est point rompu par la fraction de… …   Dictionnaire de l'Académie française

  • fraction — frac‧tion [ˈfrækʆn] noun [countable] a very small amount of something: • Generic versions of the drug sell for a fraction of the branded price. * * * fraction UK US /ˈfrækʃən/ noun [C, usually singular] ► a small part or amount of something:… …   Financial and business terms

  • fraction — in general use means ‘a very small part’: • Teaching loads at white schools often are only a fraction the size of those at black schools Saturday Review, AmE 1971. This use is idiomatic despite the pedantic objection occasionally heard that a… …   Modern English usage

  • Fraction — Frac tion, v. t. (Chem.) To separate by means of, or to subject to, fractional distillation or crystallization; to fractionate; frequently used with out; as, to fraction out a certain grade of oil from pretroleum. [1913 Webster] …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • fraction — [n1] part bite, chunk, cut, division, end, fragment, half, piece, portion, section, share, slice; concept 835 Ant. entirety, total, whole fraction [n2] incomplete number bit, division, fragment, part, partial, piece, portion, quotient, ratio,… …   New thesaurus

  • Fraction — (v. lat.), 1) Bruch; 2) das Brechen; 3) in den parlamentarischen Parteien die kleineren Unterabtheilungen od. Gruppen, welche in einzelnen Principienfragen von der Hauptpartei abweichen …   Pierer's Universal-Lexikon

  • Fraction — Fraction, lat. fractio, Brechung, Bruch; Partei. Fractur, Knochenbruch; in der Buchdruckerei die eckige deutsche Schrift; in der Kalligraphie die Kanzleischrift, die nachgeahmte deutsche Druckschrift …   Herders Conversations-Lexikon

  • fraction — index constituent (part), element, installment, member (constituent part), modicum, moiety, part …   Law dictionary

  • fraction — late 14c., originally in the mathematical sense, from Anglo Fr. fraccioun (O.Fr. fraccion, 12c., breaking ) and directly from L.L. fractionem (nom. fractio) a breaking, especially into pieces, noun of action from pp. stem of L. frangere to break …   Etymology dictionary

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