Fork head
Fork Fork (f[^o]rk), n. [AS. forc, fr. L. furca. Cf. {Fourch['e]}, {Furcate}.] 1. An instrument consisting of a handle with a shank terminating in two or more prongs or tines, which are usually of metal, parallel and slightly curved; -- used for piercing, holding, taking up, or pitching anything. [1913 Webster]

2. Anything furcate or like a fork in shape, or furcate at the extremity; as, a tuning fork. [1913 Webster]

3. One of the parts into which anything is furcated or divided; a prong; a branch of a stream, a road, etc.; a barbed point, as of an arrow. [1913 Webster]

Let it fall . . . though the fork invade The region of my heart. --Shak. [1913 Webster]

A thunderbolt with three forks. --Addison. [1913 Webster]

4. The place where a division or a union occurs; the angle or opening between two branches or limbs; as, the fork of a river, a tree, or a road. [1913 Webster]

5. The gibbet. [Obs.] --Bp. Butler. [1913 Webster]

{Fork beam} (Shipbuilding), a half beam to support a deck, where hatchways occur.

{Fork chuck} (Wood Turning), a lathe center having two prongs for driving the work.

{Fork head}. (a) The barbed head of an arrow. (b) The forked end of a rod which forms part of a knuckle joint.

{In fork}. (Mining) A mine is said to be in fork, or an engine to ``have the water in fork,'' when all the water is drawn out of the mine. --Ure.

{The forks of a river} or {The forks of a road}, the branches into which it divides, or which come together to form it; the place where separation or union takes place. [1913 Webster]


The Collaborative International Dictionary of English. 2000.

Look at other dictionaries:

  • fork|head — «FRK HEHD», noun. an arrowhead having two points directed forward …   Useful english dictionary

  • fork-head — …   Useful english dictionary

  • Fork — (f[^o]rk), n. [AS. forc, fr. L. furca. Cf. {Fourch[ e]}, {Furcate}.] 1. An instrument consisting of a handle with a shank terminating in two or more prongs or tines, which are usually of metal, parallel and slightly curved; used for piercing,… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Fork beam — Fork Fork (f[^o]rk), n. [AS. forc, fr. L. furca. Cf. {Fourch[ e]}, {Furcate}.] 1. An instrument consisting of a handle with a shank terminating in two or more prongs or tines, which are usually of metal, parallel and slightly curved; used for… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Fork chuck — Fork Fork (f[^o]rk), n. [AS. forc, fr. L. furca. Cf. {Fourch[ e]}, {Furcate}.] 1. An instrument consisting of a handle with a shank terminating in two or more prongs or tines, which are usually of metal, parallel and slightly curved; used for… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Fork Mountain, Tennessee — is a former coal mining camp, located on Tennessee State Route 116 and the New River, at the Morgan County Anderson County line. Petros is 4.2 miles to the south. Frozen Head State Park is nearby with the park boundary including part of the… …   Wikipedia

  • Head of Chezzetcook, Nova Scotia — Head of Chezzetcook is a community on the Eastern Shore Marine Drive route of Halifax Regional Municipality in Nova Scotia. The Head of Chezzetcook area begins at the intersections of routes 7 and 207, near Porters Lake and West Chezzetcook, and… …   Wikipedia

  • Head tube — In vehicle frames, most commonly of a bicycle or motorcycle [cite web url = http://www.chopper kit.co.uk/ame chopper kit installation.htm title = Chopper kit installation Guide accessdate = 2007 04 11] , the head tube is the outer tube within… …   Wikipedia

  • Fork bomb — The concept behind the fork bomb – the processes recursively fork until a denial of service or a crash occurs In computing, the fork bomb is a form of denial of service attack against a computer system which makes use of the fork operation (or… …   Wikipedia

  • Fork in the road (metaphor) — A fork in the road is a metaphor, , for a deciding moment or a in life or history when a major choice of options is required. Compare crossing the Rubicon . Examples*There is a common motif in Russian folk tales, where a vityaz (Russian knight)… …   Wikipedia

Share the article and excerpts

Direct link
Do a right-click on the link above
and select “Copy Link”