Foreyard
Foreyard Fore"yard`, n. (Naut.) The lowermost yard on the foremast.

Note: [See Illust. of {Ship}.] [1913 Webster]


The Collaborative International Dictionary of English. 2000.

Look at other dictionaries:

  • foreyard — [for′yärd΄] n. the lowest yard on the foremast, from which the foresail is set …   English World dictionary

  • foreyard — /fawr yahrd , fohr /, n. 1. a yard on the lower mast of a square rigged foremast of a ship used to support the foresail. 2. a yard on the lowest spar of the foremast of a topsail schooner used to hold out the clews of the topsail or lower… …   Universalium

  • foreyard — noun A yard on the lower mast of a square rigged foremast of a ship used to support the foresail. Syn: headyard …   Wiktionary

  • foreyard — n. lower beam on the foremast of a ship …   English contemporary dictionary

  • foreyard — noun the lowest yard on a sailing ship s foremast …   English new terms dictionary

  • foreyard — /ˈfɔjad/ (say fawyahd) noun the lower yard on the foremast of a ship …   Australian English dictionary

  • foreyard — n. Naut. the lowest yard on a foremast …   Useful english dictionary

  • Foresail — Fore sail , n. (Naut.) (a) The sail bent to the foreyard of a square rigged vessel, being the lowest sail on the foremast. (b) The gaff sail set on the foremast of a schooner. (c) The fore staysail of a sloop, being the triangular sail next… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Battle of Cape St Vincent (1797) — Infobox Military Conflict conflict=Battle of Cape St. Vincent partof=the French Revolutionary Wars campaign=Mediterranean Theater French Revolutionary Wars caption= The Battle of Cape St Vincent, 14 February 1797 by Robert Cleveley date=14… …   Wikipedia

  • Parmelia (barque) — The Parmelia was a barque that was used to transport the first civilian officials and settlers of the Swan River Colony to Western Australia in 1829. Parmelia was built in Quebec, Canada in 1825, and registered on 31 May of that year. She was 117 …   Wikipedia

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