Fore
Fore Fore (f[=o]r), a. [See {Fore}, adv.] Advanced, as compared with something else; toward the front; being or coming first, in time, place, order, or importance; preceding; anterior; antecedent; earlier; forward; -- opposed to {back} or {behind}; as, the fore part of a garment; the fore part of the day; the fore and of a wagon. [1913 Webster]

The free will of the subject is preserved, while it is directed by the fore purpose of the state. --Southey. [1913 Webster]

Note: Fore is much used adjectively or in composition. [1913 Webster]

{Fore bay}, a reservoir or canal between a mill race and a water wheel; the discharging end of a pond or mill race.

{Fore body} (Shipbuilding), the part of a ship forward of the largest cross-section, distinguished from {middle body} and {after body}.

{Fore boot}, a receptacle in the front of a vehicle, for stowing baggage, etc.

{Fore bow}, the pommel of a saddle. --Knight.

{Fore cabin}, a cabin in the fore part of a ship, usually with inferior accommodations.

{Fore carriage}. (a) The forward part of the running gear of a four-wheeled vehicle. (b) A small carriage at the front end of a plow beam.

{Fore course} (Naut.), the lowermost sail on the foremost of a square-rigged vessel; the foresail. See Illust. under {Sail}.

{Fore door}. Same as {Front door}.

{Fore edge}, the front edge of a book or folded sheet, etc.

{Fore elder}, an ancestor. [Prov. Eng.]

{Fore end}. (a) The end which precedes; the earlier, or the nearer, part; the beginning. [1913 Webster]

I have . . . paid More pious debts to heaven, than in all The fore end of my time. --Shak. (b) In firearms, the wooden stock under the barrel, forward of the trigger guard, or breech frame.

{Fore girth}, a girth for the fore part (of a horse, etc.); a martingale.

{Fore hammer}, a sledge hammer, working alternately, or in time, with the hand hammer.

{Fore leg}, one of the front legs of a quadruped, or multiped, or of a chair, settee, etc.

{Fore peak} (Naut.), the angle within a ship's bows; the portion of the hold which is farthest forward.

{Fore piece}, a front piece, as the flap in the fore part of a sidesaddle, to guard the rider's dress.

{Fore plane}, a carpenter's plane, in size and use between a jack plane and a smoothing plane. --Knight.

{Fore reading}, previous perusal. [Obs.] --Hales.

{Fore rent}, in Scotland, rent payable before a crop is gathered.

{Fore sheets} (Naut.), the forward portion of a rowboat; the space beyond the front thwart. See {Stern sheets}.

{Fore shore}. (a) A bank in advance of a sea wall, to break the force of the surf. (b) The seaward projecting, slightly inclined portion of a breakwater. --Knight. (c) The part of the shore between high and low water marks.

{Fore sight}, that one of the two sights of a gun which is near the muzzle.

{Fore tackle} (Naut.), the tackle on the foremast of a ship.

{Fore topmast}. (Naut.) See {Fore-topmast}, in the Vocabulary.

{Fore wind}, a favorable wind. [Obs.] [1913 Webster]

Sailed on smooth seas, by fore winds borne. --Sandys.

{Fore world}, the antediluvian world. [R.] --Southey. [1913 Webster]


The Collaborative International Dictionary of English. 2000.

Synonyms:

Look at other dictionaries:

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  • Fore — can mean: *Fore (people), a highland people of Papua New Guinea. *Fore (golf), a warning yelled by golfers. *Fore Abbey, an abbey in Ireland. *Fore, County Westmeath a village beside Fore Abbey. *Fore River (Maine), a river * Fore! , the 4th… …   Wikipedia

  • Fore — Fore, n. The front; hence, that which is in front; the future. [1913 Webster] {At the fore} (Naut.), at the fore royal masthead; said of a flag, so raised as a signal for sailing, etc. {To the fore}. (a) In advance; to the front; to a prominent… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Fore — Fore, adv. [AS. fore, adv. & prep., another form of for. See {For}, and cf. {Former}, {Foremost}.] 1. In the part that precedes or goes first; opposed to aft, after, back, behind, etc. [1913 Webster] 2. Formerly; previously; afore. [Obs. or… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Fore! — Saltar a navegación, búsqueda Fore! Álbum de Huey Lewis and the News Publicación 20 de septiembre, 1986 Grabación Studio D de Sausalito, California …   Wikipedia Español

  • Fore — 〈[fɔ:(r)] Sp.; Golf〉 Achtung! (Warnruf) [engl., eigtl. „vorn“] * * * Fö|re, die; [schwed. före, norw. føre, zu schwed. föra, norw. føra = führen] (Ski): Eignung des Schnees zum Fahren; Geführigkeit. * * * Fö|re, die; [schwed. före, norw. føre, zu …   Universal-Lexikon

  • Føre — Administration Pays  Norvege !Norvège …   Wikipédia en Français

  • fore — To the fore was originally a Scottish and Anglo Irish phrase meaning ‘at hand, available, surviving’. It came into English literary use during the 19c, and in current standard English means ‘into view, to the front’. A person is said to have come …   Modern English usage

  • fore — [fôr, fōr] adv. [ME < OE fore, foran, akin to Ger vor < IE base * per , through, throughout, before > FOR1, FOR , L per] 1. at, in, or toward the bow of a ship: only in FORE AND AFT 2. Obs. previously adj …   English World dictionary

  • Fore — (f[=o]r), n. [AS. f[=o]r, fr. faran to go. See {Fare}, v. i.] Journey; way; method of proceeding. [Obs.] Follow him and his fore. Chaucer. [1913 Webster] …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

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