Flinching
Flinch Flinch, v. i. [imp. & p. p. {Flinched}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Flinching}.] [Prob. fr. OE. flecchen to waver, give way, F. fl['e]chir, fr. L. flectere to bend; but prob. influenced by E. blench. Cf. {Flex}.] 1. To withdraw from any suffering or undertaking, from pain or danger; to fail in doing or perserving; to show signs of yielding or of suffering; to shrink; to wince; as, one of the parties flinched from the combat. [1913 Webster]

A child, by a constant course of kindness, may be accustomed to bear very rough usage without flinching or complaining. --Locke. [1913 Webster]

2. (Croquet) To let the foot slip from a ball, when attempting to give a tight croquet. [1913 Webster]


The Collaborative International Dictionary of English. 2000.

Look at other dictionaries:

  • flinching — un·flinching; …   English syllables

  • flinching — flɪntʃ n. act of wincing or recoiling in fear, show of fear v. wince, shrink, recoil, draw back, show fear or pain …   English contemporary dictionary

  • flinching — flinchˈing noun and adjective • • • Main Entry: ↑flinch …   Useful english dictionary

  • recoil — vb 1 Recoil, shrink, flinch, wince, blench, quail can all mean to draw back from something, usually through fear, faintheartedness, or disgust. Recoil more than any of the succeeding terms suggests the physical signs of such drawing back or the… …   New Dictionary of Synonyms

  • Flinch — Flinch, v. i. [imp. & p. p. {Flinched}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Flinching}.] [Prob. fr. OE. flecchen to waver, give way, F. fl[ e]chir, fr. L. flectere to bend; but prob. influenced by E. blench. Cf. {Flex}.] 1. To withdraw from any suffering or… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Flinched — Flinch Flinch, v. i. [imp. & p. p. {Flinched}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Flinching}.] [Prob. fr. OE. flecchen to waver, give way, F. fl[ e]chir, fr. L. flectere to bend; but prob. influenced by E. blench. Cf. {Flex}.] 1. To withdraw from any suffering or… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • bear — I. noun (plural bears) Usage: often attributive Etymology: Middle English bere, from Old English bera; akin to Old English brūn brown more at brown Date: before 12th century 1. (or pl bear) any of a family (Ursidae of the order Carnivora) of… …   New Collegiate Dictionary

  • recoil — I. intransitive verb Etymology: Middle English reculen, recoilen, from Anglo French reculer, recuiler, from re + cul backside more at culet Date: 14th century 1. a. to fall back under pressure b. to shrink back physically or emotionally 2. to… …   New Collegiate Dictionary

  • Karna — (Sanskrit: कर्ण written Karṇa in IAST transliteration) is one of the central characters of the Mahābhārata. He was born of Kunti, before her marriage to Pandu. A close friend of Duryodhana, Karna fought in his behalf against the Pandavas his… …   Wikipedia

  • Military history of the Russian Empire — Armies of Russia Kievan Rus Druzhina (862–1400s) Voyi …   Wikipedia

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