Flight of stairs
Stair Stair (st[^a]r), n. [OE. steir, steyer, AS. st[=ae]ger, from st[imac]gan to ascend, rise. [root]164. See {Sty} to ascend.] 1. One step of a series for ascending or descending to a different level; -- commonly applied to those within a building. [1913 Webster]

2. A series of steps, as for passing from one story of a house to another; -- commonly used in the plural; but originally used in the singular only. ``I a winding stair found.'' --Chaucer's Dream. [1913 Webster]

{Below stairs}, in the basement or lower part of a house, where the servants are.

{Flight of stairs}, the stairs which make the whole ascent of a story.

{Pair of stairs}, a set or flight of stairs. -- pair, in this phrase, having its old meaning of a set. See {Pair}, n., 1.

{Run of stairs} (Arch.), a single set of stairs, or section of a stairway, from one platform to the next.

{Stair rod}, a rod, usually of metal, for holding a stair carpet to its place.

{Up stairs}. See {Upstairs} in the Vocabulary. [1913 Webster]


The Collaborative International Dictionary of English. 2000.

Look at other dictionaries:

  • Pair of stairs — Stair Stair (st[^a]r), n. [OE. steir, steyer, AS. st[=ae]ger, from st[imac]gan to ascend, rise. [root]164. See {Sty} to ascend.] 1. One step of a series for ascending or descending to a different level; commonly applied to those within a building …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Run of stairs — Stair Stair (st[^a]r), n. [OE. steir, steyer, AS. st[=ae]ger, from st[imac]gan to ascend, rise. [root]164. See {Sty} to ascend.] 1. One step of a series for ascending or descending to a different level; commonly applied to those within a building …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • flight — I. noun Usage: often attributive Etymology: Middle English, from Old English flyht; akin to Middle Dutch vlucht flight, Old English flēogan to fly Date: before 12th century 1. a. an act or instance of passing through the air by the use of wings < …   New Collegiate Dictionary

  • Flight — (fl[imac]t), n. [AS. fliht, flyht, a flying, fr. fle[ o]gan to fly; cf. flyht a fleeing, fr. fle[ o]n to flee, G. flucht a fleeing, Sw. flykt, G. flug a flying, Sw. flygt, D. vlugt a fleeing or flying, Dan. flugt. [root]84. See {Flee}, {Fly}.] 1 …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Flight feathers — Flight Flight (fl[imac]t), n. [AS. fliht, flyht, a flying, fr. fle[ o]gan to fly; cf. flyht a fleeing, fr. fle[ o]n to flee, G. flucht a fleeing, Sw. flykt, G. flug a flying, Sw. flygt, D. vlugt a fleeing or flying, Dan. flugt. [root]84. See… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Flight 714 — Graphicnovelbox| englishtitle=Flight 714 foreigntitle=Vol 714 pour Sydney caption=Cover of the old English edition, using its former title publisher=Casterman date=1968 series= The Adventures of Tintin (Les aventures de Tintin)… …   Wikipedia

  • Below stairs — Stair Stair (st[^a]r), n. [OE. steir, steyer, AS. st[=ae]ger, from st[imac]gan to ascend, rise. [root]164. See {Sty} to ascend.] 1. One step of a series for ascending or descending to a different level; commonly applied to those within a building …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Up stairs — Stair Stair (st[^a]r), n. [OE. steir, steyer, AS. st[=ae]ger, from st[imac]gan to ascend, rise. [root]164. See {Sty} to ascend.] 1. One step of a series for ascending or descending to a different level; commonly applied to those within a building …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Dog-leg (stairs) — Dog leg is a term used to describe a configuration of stairs between two floors of a building, often a domestic building, in which a flight of stairs ascends to a half landing before turning 180 degrees and continuing upwards.[1] The flights do… …   Wikipedia

  • Minor characters of Days of our Lives — The following are minor but notable fictional characters on the NBC soap opera Days of our Lives, whose connections to the major families are either weak or non existent. Contents 1 Recent/current minor characters 1.1 Dr. Richard Baker 1.2… …   Wikipedia

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