Fibre
Fiber Fi"ber, Fibre Fi"bre,, n. [F. fibre, L. fibra.] 1. One of the delicate, threadlike portions of which the tissues of plants and animals are in part constituted; as, the fiber of flax or of muscle. [1913 Webster]

2. Any fine, slender thread, or threadlike substance; as, a fiber of spun glass; especially, one of the slender rootlets of a plant. [WordNet sense 1] [1913 Webster]

3. the inherent complex of attributes that determine a person's moral and ethical actions and reactions; sinew; strength; toughness; as, a man of real fiber. [WordNet sense 2]

Syn: character, fibre. [1913 Webster + WordNet 1.5]

Yet had no fibers in him, nor no force. --Chapman. [1913 Webster]

4. A general name for the raw material, such as cotton, flax, hemp, etc., used in textile manufactures. [1913 Webster]

5. (Nutrition) that portion of food composed of carbohydrates which are completely or partly indigestible, such as cellulose or pectin; it may be in an insoluble or a soluble form. It provides bulk to the solid waste and stimulates peristalsis in the intestine. It is found especially in grains, fruits, and vegetables. There is some medical evidence which indicates that diets high in fiber reduce the risk of colon cancer and reduce cholesterol levels in the blood. It is also called {dietary fiber}, {roughage}, or {bulk}. [PJC]

6. a leatherlike material made by compressing layers of paper or cloth. [WordNet sense 3]

Syn: fibre, vulcanized fiber. [WordNet 1.5]

{Fiber gun}, a kind of steam gun for converting, wood, straw, etc., into fiber. The material is shut up in the gun with steam, air, or gas at a very high pressure which is afterward relieved suddenly by letting a lid at the muzzle fly open, when the rapid expansion separates the fibers.

{Fiber plants} (Bot.), plants capable of yielding fiber useful in the arts, as hemp, flax, ramie, agave, etc.


The Collaborative International Dictionary of English. 2000.

Synonyms:

Look at other dictionaries:

  • fibre — [ fibr ] n. f. • 1372; lat. fibra 1 ♦ Anat. Formation élémentaire, végétale ou animale, d aspect filamenteux, se présentant généralement sous forme de faisceaux. Fibre conjonctive, musculaire, nerveuse. ⇒ nerf. Petite fibre. ⇒ fibrille. ♢ Cour.… …   Encyclopédie Universelle

  • Fibre — zur Verwendung als Besatzmaterial für Bürsten Fibre (engl.=Faser) ist eine gelbe Naturfaser. Sie wird aus den Blattrippen hauptsächlich zweier Agavenarten gewonnen, die auf dem mexikanischen Hochplateau wachsen. Ursprünglich wurden die Blätter… …   Deutsch Wikipedia

  • fibre — UK US /ˈfaɪbər/ noun UK (US fiber) ► [C or U] a thread like part made from plants or artificial material which can be made into products: »Natural fibres such as cotton tend to be cooler. »artificial/man made/synthetic fibre(s) »They use… …   Financial and business terms

  • fibre — (US fiber) ► NOUN 1) a thread or filament from which a plant or animal tissue, mineral substance, or textile is formed. 2) a substance formed of fibres. 3) dietary material containing substances such as cellulose, that are resistant to the action …   English terms dictionary

  • fibre — n. Same as {fiber}. [Mostly British usage] [WordNet 1.5] …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Fibre —   [dt. (Glas )Faser], britische Schreibweise für Fiber …   Universal-Lexikon

  • fibré — fibré, ée (fi bré, brée) adj. Synonyme de fibreux …   Dictionnaire de la Langue Française d'Émile Littré

  • fibre — British English spelling of FIBER (Cf. fiber) (q.v.); for spelling, see RE (Cf. re) …   Etymology dictionary

  • fibre — is the spelling in BrE and fiber in AmE …   Modern English usage

  • fibre — FIBRE. s. f. On appelle ainsi Certains filaments deliez qui se trouvent dans toutes les parties charnuës ou membraneuses du corps de l animal, L alongement des fibres. le relaschement des fibres. l accourcissement des fibres. les fibres des… …   Dictionnaire de l'Académie française

  • fibre — [fī′bər] n. Brit. sp. of FIBER …   English World dictionary

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