feague
feague feague (f[=e]g), v. t. [Cf. G. fegen to sweep, Icel. f[ae]gja to cleanse, polish, E. fair, fay, to fit, fey to cleanse.] To beat or whip; to drive. [Obs.] --Otway. [1913 Webster]

The Collaborative International Dictionary of English. 2000.

Look at other dictionaries:

  • feague — /fēg/ (obsolete) transitive verb 1. To whip 2. To perplex ORIGIN: Cf Du vegen, Ger fegen …   Useful english dictionary

  • Feague — An 1811 dictionary states: to feague a horse is to put ginger up a horse’s fundament, and formerly, as it is said, a live eel, to make him lively and carry his tail well. It is said, a forfeit is incurred by any horse dealer’s servant, who shall… …   Wikipedia

  • feague — verb a) To decorate or improve in appearance through artificial means. b) To increase the liveliness of a horse by inserting an irritant, such as a piece of peeled raw ginger, in its fundament …   Wiktionary

  • feague — The act of putting ginger (or a live eel) in a horse s behind to make him carry his tail properly …   Grandiloquent dictionary

  • Figging — Fertiger Ingwerfinger Figging ist eine Sexualpraktik im BDSM, bei der ein vorbereitetes Stück Ingwer (ähnlich wie ein Zäpfchen oder ein kleiner Butt Plug) in den Anus des Bottoms eingeführt wird …   Deutsch Wikipedia

  • Politics of Burma — Burma (Myanmar) This article is part of the series: Politics and government of Burma …   Wikipedia

  • fake — [19] The use of fake for ‘produce a fraudulent copy of’ is a comparatively recent 209 fancy development. It used to mean ‘do up something spurious to make it seem genuine’, and in this sense seems to be a descendant of the longobsolete verb… …   The Hutchinson dictionary of word origins

  • gin — {{11}}gin (n.1) type of distilled drinking alcohol, 1714, shortening of geneva, altered (by influence of the similarity of the name of the Swiss city, with which it has no other connection) from Du. genever juniper (because the alcohol was… …   Etymology dictionary

  • fake — [19] The use of fake for ‘produce a fraudulent copy of’ is a comparatively recent development. It used to mean ‘do up something spurious to make it seem genuine’, and in this sense seems to be a descendant of the longobsolete verb feague [16].… …   Word origins

  • Fey — Fey, v. t. [Cf. {Feague}.] To cleanse; to clean out. [Obs.] Tusser. [1913 Webster] …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

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