Explicated
Explicate Ex"pli*cate, v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Explicated}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Explicating}.] 1. To unfold; to expand; to lay open. [Obs.] ``They explicate the leaves.'' --Blackmore. [1913 Webster]

2. To unfold the meaning or sense of; to explain; to clear of difficulties or obscurity; to interpret. [1913 Webster]

The last verse of his last satire is not yet sufficiently explicated. --Dryden. [1913 Webster]


The Collaborative International Dictionary of English. 2000.

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