Excoriate Ex*co"ri*ate, v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Excoriated}; p. pr. & vb. n. {excoriating}.] [L. excoriare; ex out + corium hide. cf. {Scourge}; see {Cuirass}.] To strip or wear off the skin of; to abrade; to gall; to break and remove the cuticle of, in any manner, as by rubbing, beating, or by the action of acrid substances. [1913 Webster]

The Collaborative International Dictionary of English. 2000.


Look at other dictionaries:

  • excoriate — [v1] scrape layers off abrade, chafe, flay, fret, gall, peel, rub, scarify, scratch, skin, strip; concepts 211,215 excoriate [v2] denounce, criticize attack, berate, blister, castigate, censure, chastise, condemn, flay, lambaste, lash, rebuke,… …   New thesaurus

  • excoriate — index castigate, censure, denounce (condemn), deprecate, disapprove (condemn), lash (attack verbally) …   Law dictionary

  • excoriate — early 15c., from L.L. excoriatus, pp. of excoriare flay, strip off the hide, from L. ex off (see EX (Cf. ex )) + corium hide, skin (see CORIUM (Cf. corium)). Figurative sense of denounce, censure first recorded in English 1708. Related:… …   Etymology dictionary

  • excoriate — *abrade, chafe, fret, gall Analogous words: *strip, divest, denude, bare: flay, *skin: torture, torment, rack (see AFFLICT): tongue lash, revile, berate (see SCOLD) …   New Dictionary of Synonyms

  • excoriate — ► VERB 1) chiefly Medicine damage or remove part of the surface of (the skin). 2) formal censure or criticize severely. DERIVATIVES excoriation noun. ORIGIN Latin excoriare to skin …   English terms dictionary

  • excoriate — [ek skôr′ē āt΄, ikskôr′ē āt΄] vt. excoriated, excoriating [ME excoriaten < L excoriatus, pp. of excoriare < ex , out, off + corium, the skin: see CORIUM] 1. to strip, scratch, or rub off the skin of; flay, abrade, chafe, etc. 2. to denounce …   English World dictionary

  • excoriate — [[t]ɪkskɔ͟ːrieɪt[/t]] excoriates, excoriating, excoriated VERB To excoriate a person or organization means to criticize them severely, usually in public. [FORMAL] [V n] He proceeded to excoriate me in front of the nurses. Syn: berate …   English dictionary

  • excoriate — coruscate, excoriate Confusion of these two somewhat literary words caused by the coincidence of the syllable cor and the ending ate is a common malapropism. To coruscate (from Latin coruscare) is to glitter or give off flashes of light, and it… …   Modern English usage

  • excoriate — transitive verb ( ated; ating) Etymology: Middle English, from Late Latin excoriatus, past participle of excoriare, from Latin ex + corium skin, hide more at cuirass Date: 15th century 1. to wear off the skin of ; abrade 2. to censure scathingly… …   New Collegiate Dictionary

  • excoriate — /ik skawr ee ayt , skohr /, v.t., excoriated, excoriating. 1. to denounce or berate severely; flay verbally: He was excoriated for his mistakes. 2. to strip off or remove the skin from: Her palms were excoriated by the hard labor of shoveling.… …   Universalium

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