Every each
Every Ev"er*y, a. & a. pron. [OE. everich, everilk; AS. [=ae]fre ever + [ae]lc each. See {Ever}, {each}.] 1. All the parts which compose a whole collection or aggregate number, considered in their individuality, all taken separately one by one, out of an indefinite number. [1913 Webster]

Every man at his best state is altogether vanity. --Ps. xxxix. 5. [1913 Webster]

Every door and window was adorned with wreaths of flowers. --Macaulay. [1913 Webster]

2. Every one. Cf. {Each}. [Obs.] ``Every of your wishes.'' --Shak. [1913 Webster]

Daily occasions given to every of us. --Hooker. [1913 Webster]

{Every each}, every one. [Obs.] ``Every each of them hath some vices.'' --Burton..

{Every now and then}, at short intervals; occasionally; repeatedly; frequently. [Colloq.] [1913 Webster]

Note: Every may, by way of emphasis, precede the article the with a superlative adjective; as, every, the least variation. --Locke.

Syn: {Every}, {Each}, {Any}.

Usage: Any denotes one, or some, taken indifferently from the individuals which compose a class. Every differs from each in giving less prominence to the selection of the individual. Each relates to two or more individuals of a class. It refers definitely to every one of them, denoting that they are considered separately, one by one, all being included; as, each soldier was receiving a dollar per day. Every relates to more than two and brings into greater prominence the notion that not one of all considered is excepted; as, every soldier was on service, except the cavalry, that is, all the soldiers, etc. [1913 Webster]

In each division there were four pentecosties, in every pentecosty four enomoties, and of each enomoty there fought in the front rank four [soldiers]. --Jowett (Thucyd. ). [1913 Webster]

If society is to be kept together and the children of Adam to be saved from setting up each for himself with every one else his foe. --J. H. Newman. [1913 Webster]


The Collaborative International Dictionary of English. 2000.

Look at other dictionaries:

  • Every — Ev er*y, a. & a. pron. [OE. everich, everilk; AS. [=ae]fre ever + [ae]lc each. See {Ever}, {each}.] 1. All the parts which compose a whole collection or aggregate number, considered in their individuality, all taken separately one by one, out of… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Every now and then — Every Ev er*y, a. & a. pron. [OE. everich, everilk; AS. [=ae]fre ever + [ae]lc each. See {Ever}, {each}.] 1. All the parts which compose a whole collection or aggregate number, considered in their individuality, all taken separately one by one,… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • each — O.E. ælc any, all, every, each (one), short for a gelic ever alike, from a ever (see AYE (Cf. aye) (2)) + gelic alike (see LIKE (Cf. like) (adj.)). From a common West Germanic expression *aiwo galika (Cf. Du. elk, O.Fris …   Etymology dictionary

  • every — each, *all …   New Dictionary of Synonyms

  • each — 1. pronoun there are 47 books and each must be read Syn: every one, each one, each and every one, all, the whole lot 2. adjective he visited each month Syn: every, each and every, every single 3. adverb they gave $10 each Syn …   Thesaurus of popular words

  • each — Synonyms and related words: all, all and some, all and sundry, any, apiece, aside, each and all, each and every, each one, each to each, every, every one, one and all, one by one, particular, per, per annum, per capita, respective, respectively,… …   Moby Thesaurus

  • each — W1S1 [i:tʃ] determiner, pron, adv [: Old English; Origin: Alc] 1.) every one of two or more things or people, considered separately →↑every ▪ She had a bottle in each hand. ▪ Grill the fish for five minutes on each side. ▪ Each member of the team …   Dictionary of contemporary English

  • every — 1. differences between each and every. Both words denote all the people or things in a group, and both normally govern a singular verb (for some exceptions see each). But each is a pronoun (as in I ll take three of each) as well as an adjective… …   Modern English usage

  • Each — ([=e]ch), a. or a. pron. [OE. eche, [ae]lc, elk, ilk, AS. [ae]lc; [=a] always + gel[=i]c like; akin to OD. iegelik, OHG. [=e]ogil[=i]h, MHG. iegel[=i]ch, G. jeglich. [root]209. See 3d {Aye}, {Like}, and cf. {Either}, {Every}, {Ilk}.] 1. Every one …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • each — [ itʃ ] function word, quantifier *** Each can be used in the following ways: as a determiner (followed by a singular countable noun): in each corner of the room as a pronoun: three windows, with a different view from each (followed by of ): I… …   Usage of the words and phrases in modern English

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