Everich
Everich Ev"er*ich, Everych Ev"er*ych, a. [OE. see {Every}.] each one; every one; each of two. See {Every}. [Obs.] --Chaucer.

The Collaborative International Dictionary of English. 2000.

Look at other dictionaries:

  • Everych — Everich Ev er*ich, Everych Ev er*ych, a. [OE. see {Every}.] each one; every one; each of two. See {Every}. [Obs.] Chaucer …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • every which way — adverb 1. in a random manner (Freq. 1) the houses were randomly scattered bullets were fired into the crowd at random • Syn: ↑randomly, ↑indiscriminately, ↑haphazardly, ↑willy nilly, ↑arbitrarily …   Useful english dictionary

  • Everichon — Ev er*ich*on , Everychon Ev er*ych*on , pron. [OE. everich + oon, on, one. See {Every}, and {One}.] Every one. [Obs.] Chaucer. [1913 Webster] …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Every — Ev er*y, a. & a. pron. [OE. everich, everilk; AS. [=ae]fre ever + [ae]lc each. See {Ever}, {each}.] 1. All the parts which compose a whole collection or aggregate number, considered in their individuality, all taken separately one by one, out of… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Every each — Every Ev er*y, a. & a. pron. [OE. everich, everilk; AS. [=ae]fre ever + [ae]lc each. See {Ever}, {each}.] 1. All the parts which compose a whole collection or aggregate number, considered in their individuality, all taken separately one by one,… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Every now and then — Every Ev er*y, a. & a. pron. [OE. everich, everilk; AS. [=ae]fre ever + [ae]lc each. See {Ever}, {each}.] 1. All the parts which compose a whole collection or aggregate number, considered in their individuality, all taken separately one by one,… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Everychon — Everichon Ev er*ich*on , Everychon Ev er*ych*on , pron. [OE. everich + oon, on, one. See {Every}, and {One}.] Every one. [Obs.] Chaucer. [1913 Webster] …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Inn — Inn, v. t. 1. To house; to lodge. [Obs.] [1913 Webster] When he had brought them into his city And inned them, everich at his degree. Chaucer. [1913 Webster] 2. To get in; to in. See {In}, v. t. [1913 Webster] …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • every — adjective Etymology: Middle English everich, every, from Old English ǣfre ǣlc, from ǣfre ever + ǣlc each Date: before 12th century 1. a. being each individual or part of a group without exception b. being each in a series or succession < every… …   New Collegiate Dictionary

  • every which way — adverb Etymology: probably by folk etymology from Middle English everich way every way Date: 1824 1. in every direction 2. in a disorderly manner ; irregularly < toys scattered about every which way > …   New Collegiate Dictionary

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