Abode
Abode A*bode", v. i. To be ominous. [Obs.] --Dryden. [1913 Webster]

The Collaborative International Dictionary of English. 2000.

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  • abode — past and past part of abide Merriam Webster’s Dictionary of Law. Merriam Webster. 1996. abode …   Law dictionary

  • abode — In the meaning ‘a dwelling place’, abode is falling into disuse except in two fixed expressions: (of) no fixed abode, used of someone without a permanent address, and right of abode, especially as applied to citizens of Hong Kong who sought the… …   Modern English usage

  • abode — a‧bode [əˈbəʊd ǁ əˈboʊd] noun [countable usually singular] formal LAW the place where someone lives: • He has the right of abode in the UK (= he has the right to live there ) . * * * …   Financial and business terms

  • Abode — A*bode , n. [OE. abad, abood, fr. abiden to abide. See {Abide}. For the change of vowel, cf. abode, imp. of abide.] 1. Act of waiting; delay. [Obs.] Shak. [1913 Webster] And with her fled away without abode. Spenser. [1913 Webster] 2. Stay or… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Abode — may refer to: *House, a human built dwelling with enclosing walls, a floor, and a roof **Right of abode *World of Two Moons, a fictional Earth type planet featured in the comic book Elfquest …   Wikipedia

  • abode — ► NOUN formal or literary 1) a house or home. 2) residence: right of abode. ORIGIN from ABIDE(Cf. ↑abide) …   English terms dictionary

  • Abode — A*bode , n. [See {Bode}, v. t.] An omen. [Obs.] [1913 Webster] High thundering Juno s husband stirs my spirit with true abodes. Chapman. [1913 Webster] …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Abode — A*bode , v. t. To bode; to foreshow. [Obs.] Shak. [1913 Webster] …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Abode — A*bode , pret. of {Abide}. [1913 Webster] …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • abode — (n.) mid 13c., action of waiting, verbal noun identical with O.E. abad, pp. of abiden to abide (see ABIDE (Cf. abide)), used as a verbal noun. The present to preterite vowel change is consistent with an Old English class I strong verb (ride/rode …   Etymology dictionary

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