Etwee
Etwee \Et*wee"\ ([e^]t*e[=e]"), n. See {['E]tui}. --Shenstone. [1913 Webster]

The Collaborative International Dictionary of English. 2000.

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  • etwee — noun see etui …   Useful english dictionary

  • tweezers — noun plural but singular or plural in construction Etymology: obsolete English tweeze, noun, etui, short for obsolete English etweese, from plural of obsolete English etwee, from French étui Date: 1654 any of various small metal instruments that… …   New Collegiate Dictionary

  • etui — /ay twee , et wee/, n., pl. etuis. a small, often decorative case, esp. one for needles, toilet articles, or the like. Also, etwee. [1605 15; < F étui, OF estui holder, n. deriv. of estuier to keep < VL *studiare to treat with care] * * * …   Universalium

  • tweezers — twee|zers [ˈtwi:zəz US ərz] n [plural] [Date: 1600 1700; Origin: tweeze case of small instruments (1600 1700), from etweese tweeze (17 18 centuries), from the plural of etwee tweeze (17 19 centuries), from French étui] a small tool that has two… …   Dictionary of contemporary English

  • tweezers — [17] French étui denotes a small case for carrying personal articles, small tools and the like (it was descended from Old French estuier ‘keep, shut up, imprison’). English adopted it in the early 17th century as etui or, anglicized, as etwee.… …   The Hutchinson dictionary of word origins

  • tweezers — (n.) 1650s, extended from tweezes, plural of tweeze case for tweezers (1620s), aphetic of etweese, considered as plural of etwee (1610s) a small case, from Fr. étui small case (see ETUI (Cf. etui)). Sense transferred from the case to the… …   Etymology dictionary

  • etui — /ɛˈtwi/ (say e twee), /eɪ / (say ay ) noun (plural etuis) a small case, especially one for small objects, as needles, toilet articles, etc. Also, Chiefly US, etwee. {French étui, from Old French etuier keep, from Latin studiāre care for} …   Australian English dictionary

  • tweezers — [17] French étui denotes a small case for carrying personal articles, small tools and the like (it was descended from Old French estuier ‘keep, shut up, imprison’). English adopted it in the early 17th century as etui or, anglicized, as etwee.… …   Word origins

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