Erratic phenomena
Erratic Er*rat"ic, a. [L. erraticus, fr. errare to wander: cf. F. erratique. See {Err}.] 1. Having no certain course; roving about without a fixed destination; wandering; moving; -- hence, applied to the planets as distinguished from the fixed stars. [1913 Webster]

The earth and each erratic world. --Blackmore. [1913 Webster]

2. Deviating from a wise of the common course in opinion or conduct; eccentric; strange; queer; as, erratic conduct. [1913 Webster]

3. Irregular; changeable. ``Erratic fever.'' --Harvey. [1913 Webster]

{Erratic blocks}, {gravel, etc.} (Geol.), masses of stone which have been transported from their original resting places by the agency of water, ice, or other causes.

{Erratic phenomena}, the phenomena which relate to transported materials on the earth's surface. [1913 Webster]


The Collaborative International Dictionary of English. 2000.

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  • Erratic — Er*rat ic, a. [L. erraticus, fr. errare to wander: cf. F. erratique. See {Err}.] 1. Having no certain course; roving about without a fixed destination; wandering; moving; hence, applied to the planets as distinguished from the fixed stars. [1913… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Erratic blocks — Erratic Er*rat ic, a. [L. erraticus, fr. errare to wander: cf. F. erratique. See {Err}.] 1. Having no certain course; roving about without a fixed destination; wandering; moving; hence, applied to the planets as distinguished from the fixed stars …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • gravel etc — Erratic Er*rat ic, a. [L. erraticus, fr. errare to wander: cf. F. erratique. See {Err}.] 1. Having no certain course; roving about without a fixed destination; wandering; moving; hence, applied to the planets as distinguished from the fixed stars …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

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