Enfeoffing
Enfeoff En*feoff" (?; see {Feoff}, 277), v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Enfeoffed}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Enfeoffing}.] [Pref. en- + feoff, fief: cf. LL. infeofare, OF. enfeffer, enfeofer.] 1. (Law) To give a feud, or right in land, to; to invest with a fief or fee; to invest (any one) with a freehold estate by the process of feoffment. --Mozley & W. [1913 Webster]

2. To give in vassalage; to make subservient. [Obs.] [1913 Webster]

[The king] enfeoffed himself to popularity. --Shak.


The Collaborative International Dictionary of English. 2000.

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