Endue En*due", v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Endued}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Enduing}.] [L. induere, prob. confused with E. endow. See {Indue}.] To invest. --Latham. [1913 Webster]

Tarry ye in the city of Jerusalem, until ye be endued with power from on high. --Luke xxiv. 49. [1913 Webster]

Endue them . . . with heavenly gifts. --Book of Common Prayer. [1913 Webster]

The Collaborative International Dictionary of English. 2000.

Look at other dictionaries:

  • endued — un·endued; …   English syllables

  • endued — v. furnish with some quality or ability; take on, assume; put on clothing, dress …   English contemporary dictionary

  • endued — denude …   Anagrams dictionary

  • denude — endued …   Anagrams dictionary

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  • endue — or indue transitive verb (endued or indued; enduing or induing) Etymology: Middle English, from Anglo French enduire to introduce, imbue, from Latin inducere more at induce Date: 15th century 1. provide, endow < endued with the rights of a… …   New Collegiate Dictionary

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