Amerced
Amerce A*merce" ([.a]*m[~e]rs"), v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Amerced} ([.a]*m[~e]rst"); p. pr. & vb. n. {Amercing}.] [OF. amercier, fr. a merci at the mercy of, liable to a punishment. See {Mercy}.] 1. To punish by a pecuniary penalty, the amount of which is not fixed by law, but left to the discretion of the court; as, the court amerced the criminal in the sum of one hundred dollars. [1913 Webster]

Note: The penalty or fine may be expressed without a preposition, or it may be introduced by in, with, or of. [1913 Webster]

2. To punish, in general; to mulct. [1913 Webster]

Millions of spirits for his fault amerced Of Heaven. --Milton. [1913 Webster]

Shall by him be amerced with penance due. --Spenser. [1913 Webster]


The Collaborative International Dictionary of English. 2000.

Look at other dictionaries:

  • amerced — v. punish …   English contemporary dictionary

  • Magna Carta Source — ▪ Primary Source [1215]       John, by the grace of God, king of England, lord of Ireland, duke of Normandy and Aquitaine, and count of Anjou, to the archbishops, bishops, abbots, earls, barons, justiciars, foresters, sheriffs, stewards, servants …   Universalium

  • Amerce — A*merce ([.a]*m[ e]rs ), v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Amerced} ([.a]*m[ e]rst ); p. pr. & vb. n. {Amercing}.] [OF. amercier, fr. a merci at the mercy of, liable to a punishment. See {Mercy}.] 1. To punish by a pecuniary penalty, the amount of which is… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Amercing — Amerce A*merce ([.a]*m[ e]rs ), v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Amerced} ([.a]*m[ e]rst ); p. pr. & vb. n. {Amercing}.] [OF. amercier, fr. a merci at the mercy of, liable to a punishment. See {Mercy}.] 1. To punish by a pecuniary penalty, the amount of… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • penalize — penalize, fine, amerce, mulct mean to punish by depriving of something. Penalize usually presupposes a violation of laws or rules intended to maintain discipline or fair treatment for all; it implies exaction by an authority of a pecuniary… …   New Dictionary of Synonyms

  • capias pro fine — /keypiyas prow fayniy/ (That you take for the fine or in mercy.) Formerly, if the verdict was for the defendant, the plaintiff was adjudged to be amerced for his false claim; but, if the verdict was for the plaintiff, then in all actions vi et… …   Black's law dictionary

  • capias pro fine — /keypiyas prow fayniy/ (That you take for the fine or in mercy.) Formerly, if the verdict was for the defendant, the plaintiff was adjudged to be amerced for his false claim; but, if the verdict was for the plaintiff, then in all actions vi et… …   Black's law dictionary

  • Amerceable — A*merce a*ble, a. Liable to be amerced. [1913 Webster] …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • amerce — transitive verb (amerced; amercing) Etymology: Middle English amercien, from Anglo French amercier, from Old French a merci at (one s) mercy Date: 15th century to punish by a fine whose amount is fixed by the court; broadly punish • amercement… …   New Collegiate Dictionary

  • Cirencester — Coordinates: 51°43′08″N 1°58′05″W / 51.719°N 1.968°W / 51.719; 1.968 …   Wikipedia

Share the article and excerpts

Direct link
Do a right-click on the link above
and select “Copy Link”