Amend A*mend", v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Amended}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Amending}.] [F. amender, L. emendare; e (ex) + mendum, menda, fault, akin to Skr. minda personal defect. Cf. {Emend}, {Mend}.] To change or modify in any way for the better; as, (a) by simply removing what is erroneous, corrupt, superfluous, faulty, and the like; (b) by supplying deficiencies; (c) by substituting something else in the place of what is removed; to rectify. [1913 Webster]

Mar not the thing that can not be amended. --Shak. [1913 Webster]

An instant emergency, granting no possibility for revision, or opening for amended thought. --De Quincey. [1913 Webster]

We shall cheer her sorrows, and amend her blood, by wedding her to a Norman. --Sir W. Scott. [1913 Webster]

{To amend a bill}, to make some change in the details or provisions of a bill or measure while on its passage, professedly for its improvement. [1913 Webster]

Syn: To {Amend}, {Emend}, {Correct}, {Reform}, {Rectify}.

Usage: These words agree in the idea of bringing things into a more perfect state. We correct (literally, make straight) when we conform things to some standard or rule; as, to correct proof sheets. We amend by removing blemishes, faults, or errors, and thus rendering a thing more a nearly perfect; as, to amend our ways, to amend a text, the draft of a bill, etc. Emend is only another form of amend, and is applied chiefly to editions of books, etc. To reform is literally to form over again, or put into a new and better form; as, to reform one's life. To rectify is to make right; as, to rectify a mistake, to rectify abuses, inadvertencies, etc. [1913 Webster]

The Collaborative International Dictionary of English. 2000.


Look at other dictionaries:

  • amend — vt 1: to change or modify for the better 2: to alter esp. in the wording; esp: to alter formally by modification, deletion, or addition amend ed the statute amend the complaint to cure the defect amend·able adj …   Law dictionary

  • amend — a‧mend [əˈmend] verb [transitive] to make small changes to a law or a document, for example to improve it, to make it more accurate, or to take account of new conditions: • a controversial plan to amend the Constitution amendment noun [countable …   Financial and business terms

  • Amend — as a verb means to change or modify something, as in: *Constitutional amendment *Amend (motion), a motion to modify a pending main motion in parliamentary procedure *Amend something previously adopted, a motion to modify a previously adopted… …   Wikipedia

  • Amend — ist der Familienname folgender Personen: Bill Amend (* 1962), US amerikanischer Comiczeichner Christoph Amend (* 1974), deutscher Journalist (Leiter Zeitmagazin) Erwin Amend (1919 1997), deutscher Komponist und Konzertmeister Rolf Dieter Amend (* …   Deutsch Wikipedia

  • amend — amend; amend·a·ble; amend·a·to·ry; amend·ment; re·amend; …   English syllables

  • amend — amend, emend 1. Amend is the more common word, used of making adjustments to a document or formal proposal (such as a parliamentary act), and also as a special word for ‘to change’ or ‘to alter’ in the context of personal behaviour. Its… …   Modern English usage

  • amend — ► VERB ▪ make minor improvements to (a document, proposal, etc.). DERIVATIVES amendable adjective. USAGE On the difference between amend and emend, see the note at EMEND(Cf. ↑emendation). ORIGIN L …   English terms dictionary

  • Amend — A*mend ([.a]*m[e^]nd ), v. i. To grow better by rectifying something wrong in manners or morals; to improve. My fortune . . . amends. Sir P. Sidney. [1913 Webster] …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • amend — (v.) early 13c., to free from faults, rectify, from O.Fr. amender (12c.), from L. emendare to correct, free from fault, from ex out (see EX (Cf. ex )) + menda fault, blemish, from PIE *mend physical defect, fault (Cf. Skt. minda physical blemish …   Etymology dictionary

  • amend — reform, *correct, rectify, revise, emend, remedy, redress Analogous words: *improve, better, ameliorate: *mend, repair: elevate, raise, *lift Antonyms: debase: impair Contrasted words: corrupt, vitiate, deprave, debauch, pervert (see DEBASE): * …   New Dictionary of Synonyms

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