Electrical machine
Electric E*lec"tric ([-e]*l[e^]k"tr[i^]k), Electrical E*lec"tric*al ([-e]*l[e^]k"tr[i^]*kal), a. [L. electrum amber, a mixed metal, Gr. 'h`lektron; akin to 'hle`ktwr the beaming sun, cf. Skr. arc to beam, shine: cf. F. ['e]lectrique. The name came from the production of electricity by the friction of amber.] 1. Pertaining to electricity; consisting of, containing, derived from, or produced by, electricity; as, electric power or virtue; an electric jar; electric effects; an electric spark; an electric charge; an electric current; an electrical engineer. [1913 Webster]

2. Capable of occasioning the phenomena of electricity; as, an electric or electrical machine or substance; an electric generator. [1913 Webster]

3. Electrifying; thrilling; magnetic. ``Electric Pindar.'' --Mrs. Browning. [1913 Webster]

4. powered by electricity; as, electrical appliances; an electric toothbrush; an electric automobile. [WordNet 1.5]

{Electric atmosphere}, or {Electric aura}. See under {Aura}.

{Electrical battery}. See {Battery}.

{Electrical brush}. See under {Brush}.

{Electric cable}. See {Telegraph cable}, under {Telegraph}.

{Electric candle}. See under {Candle}.

{Electric cat} (Zo["o]l.), one of three or more large species of African catfish of the genus {Malapterurus} (esp. {M. electricus} of the Nile). They have a large electrical organ and are able to give powerful shocks; -- called also {sheathfish}.

{Electric clock}. See under {Clock}, and see {Electro-chronograph}.

{Electric current}, a current or stream of electricity traversing a closed circuit formed of conducting substances, or passing by means of conductors from one body to another which is in a different electrical state.

{Electric eel}, or {Electrical eel} (Zo["o]l.), a South American eel-like fresh-water fish of the genus {Gymnotus} ({G. electricus}), from two to five feet in length, capable of giving a violent electric shock. See {Gymnotus}.

{Electrical fish} (Zo["o]l.), any fish which has an electrical organ by means of which it can give an electrical shock. The best known kinds are the {torpedo}, the {gymnotus}, or {electrical eel}, and the {electric cat}. See {Torpedo}, and {Gymnotus}.

{Electric fluid}, the supposed matter of electricity; lightning. [archaic]

{Electrical image} (Elec.), a collection of electrical points regarded as forming, by an analogy with optical phenomena, an image of certain other electrical points, and used in the solution of electrical problems. --Sir W. Thomson.

{Electric machine}, or {Electrical machine}, an apparatus for generating, collecting, or exciting, electricity, as by friction.

{Electric motor}. See {Electro-motor}, 2.

{Electric osmose}. (Physics) See under {Osmose}.

{Electric pen}, a hand pen for making perforated stencils for multiplying writings. It has a puncturing needle driven at great speed by a very small magneto-electric engine on the penhandle.

{Electric railway}, a railway in which the machinery for moving the cars is driven by an electric current.

{Electric ray} (Zo["o]l.), the torpedo.

{Electric telegraph}. See {Telegraph}. [1913 Webster]


The Collaborative International Dictionary of English. 2000.

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