Elate
Elate E*late", a. [L. elatus elevated, fig., elated, proud (the figure, perh., being borrowed from a prancing horse); e out + latus (used as p. p. of ferre to bear), for tlatus, and akin to E. tolerate. See {Tolerate}, and cf. {Extol}.] [1913 Webster] 1. Lifted up; raised; elevated.

With upper lip elate. --Fenton. [1913 Webster]

And sovereign law, that State's collected will, O'er thrones and globes, elate, Sits empress, crowning good, repressing ill. --Sir W. Jones. [1913 Webster]

2. Having the spirits raised by success, or by hope; flushed or exalted with confidence; elated; exultant. [1913 Webster]

O, thoughtless mortals! ever blind to fate, Too soon dejected, and dejected, and too soon elate. --Pope. [1913 Webster]

Our nineteenth century is wonderfully set up in its own esteem, wonderfully elate at its progress. --Mrs. H. H. Jackson.

Syn: Puffed up; lofty; proud; haughty; exalted; inspirited; transported; delighted; overjoyed. [1913 Webster]


The Collaborative International Dictionary of English. 2000.

Synonyms:

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  • élaté — ⇒ÉLATÉ, subst. masc. BOTANIQUE A. Palmier des Indes, proche du dattier. Rem. Attesté ds Ac. Compl. 1842, BESCH. 1845, BOUILLET 1859, Lar. 19e, BAILLON t. 2 1886, GUÉRIN 1892, Nouv. Lar. ill. B. Gaine qui enveloppe les grappes de fleurs femelles… …   Encyclopédie Universelle

  • elate — elate·ment; elate; …   English syllables

  • Elate — E*late , v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Elated}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Elating}.] 1. To raise; to exalt. [R.] [1913 Webster] By the potent sun elated high. Thomson. [1913 Webster] 2. To exalt the spirit of; to fill with confidence or exultation; to elevate or… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Elăte — (E Ait.), Pflanzengattung aus der Familie der Palmae Coryphinae Phoenicinae, 22. Kl. 6. Ordn. L., von And. zu Phönix gezählt; Art: E. sylvestris, aus Indien. Die Kernewerden wie die der Arekannß zum Kauen benutzt, liefert Palmkohl u. etwas Sago …   Pierer's Universal-Lexikon

  • elate — (v.) 1570s, literal, to raise, elevate, probably from L. elatus uplifted, exalted, pp. of effere (see ELATION (Cf. elation)), or else a back formation from elation. Figurative use from 1610s. Related: Elated; elating …   Etymology dictionary

  • elate — [ē lāt′, ilāt′] vt. elated, elating [< L elatus, pp. of efferre, to bring out, lift up < ex , out + ferre, BEAR1] to raise the spirits of; make very proud, happy, or joyful adj. Old Poet. filled with elation elatedly adv. elatedness n …   English World dictionary

  • elate — [16] Elate means literally ‘lift up’, and that is how it was originally used in English: ‘Placus doth elate his shady forehead’, George Chapman, Iliad 1611. The word comes from ēlātus, the past participle of Latin efferre. This was a compound… …   The Hutchinson dictionary of word origins

  • elate — [16] Elate means literally ‘lift up’, and that is how it was originally used in English: ‘Placus doth elate his shady forehead’, George Chapman, Iliad 1611. The word comes from ēlātus, the past participle of Latin efferre. This was a compound… …   Word origins

  • elate — I. transitive verb (elated; elating) Etymology: Latin elatus (past participle of efferre to carry out, elevate), from e + latus, past participle of ferre to carry more at tolerate, bear Date: circa 1619 to fill with joy or pride II. adjective… …   New Collegiate Dictionary

  • elate — /i layt /, v., elated, elating, adj. v.t. 1. to make very happy or proud: news to elate the hearer. adj. 2. elated. [1350 1400; ME elat proud, exalted < L elatus carried away, lifted up (ptp. of efferre), equiv. to e E + la carry, lift (see… …   Universalium

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