economic rent
Rent Rent (r[e^]nt), n. [F. rente, LL. renta, fr. L. reddita, fem. sing. or neut. pl. of redditus, p. p. of reddere to give back, pay. See {Render}.] 1. Income; revenue. See {Catel}. [Obs.] ``Catel had they enough and rent.'' --Chaucer. [1913 Webster]

[Bacchus] a waster was and all his rent In wine and bordel he dispent. --Gower. [1913 Webster]

So bought an annual rent or two, And liv'd, just as you see I do. --Pope. [1913 Webster]

2. Pay; reward; share; toll. [Obs.] [1913 Webster]

Death, that taketh of high and low his rent. --Chaucer. [1913 Webster]

3. (Law) A certain periodical profit, whether in money, provisions, chattels, or labor, issuing out of lands and tenements in payment for the use; commonly, a certain pecuniary sum agreed upon between a tenant and his landlord, paid at fixed intervals by the lessee to the lessor, for the use of land or its appendages; as, rent for a farm, a house, a park, etc. [1913 Webster]

Note: The term rent is also popularly applied to compensation for the use of certain personal chattels, as a piano, a sewing machine, etc. [1913 Webster]

4. (Polit. Econ.) (a) That portion of the produce of the earth paid to the landlord for the use of the ``original and indestructible powers of the soil;'' the excess of the return from a given piece of cultivated land over that from land of equal area at the ``margin of cultivation.'' Called also {economic rent}, or {Ricardian rent}. Economic rent is due partly to differences of productivity, but chiefly to advantages of location; it is equivalent to ordinary or commercial rent less interest on improvements, and nearly equivalent to ground rent. (b) Loosely, a return or profit from a differential advantage for production, as in case of income or earnings due to rare natural gifts creating a natural monopoly. [Webster 1913 Suppl.]

{Black rent}. See {Blackmail}, 3.

{Forehand rent}, rent which is paid in advance; foregift.

{Rent arrear}, rent in arrears; unpaid rent. --Blackstone.

{Rent charge} (Law), a rent reserved on a conveyance of land in fee simple, or granted out of lands by deed; -- so called because, by a covenant or clause in the deed of conveyance, the land is charged with a distress for the payment of it. --Bouvier.

{Rent roll}, a list or account of rents or income; a rental.

{Rent seck} (Law), a rent reserved by deed, but without any clause of distress; barren rent. A power of distress was made incident to rent seck by Statute 4 George II. c. 28.

{Rent service} (Eng. Law), rent reserved out of land held by fealty or other corporeal service; -- so called from such service being incident to it.

{White rent}, a quitrent when paid in silver; -- opposed to black rent. [1913 Webster]


The Collaborative International Dictionary of English. 2000.

Look at other dictionaries:

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  • Rent — (r[e^]nt), n. [F. rente, LL. renta, fr. L. reddita, fem. sing. or neut. pl. of redditus, p. p. of reddere to give back, pay. See {Render}.] 1. Income; revenue. See {Catel}. [Obs.] Catel had they enough and rent. Chaucer. [1913 Webster] [Bacchus]… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Rent arrear — Rent Rent (r[e^]nt), n. [F. rente, LL. renta, fr. L. reddita, fem. sing. or neut. pl. of redditus, p. p. of reddere to give back, pay. See {Render}.] 1. Income; revenue. See {Catel}. [Obs.] Catel had they enough and rent. Chaucer. [1913 Webster]… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

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